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Means of transportation are excluded from many rules regarding the EU single market and EU countries, including the Netherlands, often impose specific taxes on cars. To prevent circumventing these rules, many countries impose severe restrictions on using cars registered elsewhere than in your country of residence (citizenship is typically irrelevant and non-...


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This webpage from the Netherlands Tax & Customs Administration explains the scheme: 30% facility for incoming employees If you come to work in the Netherlands, you are possibly confronted with extra costs, so-called extraterritorial costs. Your employer may grant you a free (untaxed) reimbursement for the extraterritorial costs that you incur. Your ...


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I experienced a similar issue in Rotterdam where an agency (Domica, MaxRentals) charged me € 350 in advance in order to secure the house. I complied and paid in order to get the house. After that I requested for refund as the practice is illegal. Agency chose not to comply and did not respond. I used the questionnaire from woonbond.nl (a Dutch national ...


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Like phoog, I also suggest visiting a doctor regardless of insurance, like phoog suggested, I'd like to add that this statement: As an international student, I cannot buy into basic health insurance until I get at least a part-time job. Is not quite true. That is, you may not be automatically covered, but that doesn't mean you can't get health insurance. ...


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I have never tried to get a US prescription filled in the Netherlands, but I would be very surprised if it would work. The prescribing doctor is not licensed to practice medicine in the Netherlands, after all. However, you do not need to be insured to visit a doctor or buy prescription medicine in the Netherlands. I have done both (albeit some time ago). ...


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No, the time spent in the Netherlands does not count towards either permanent/long-term resident statuses available in Germany.


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I do something very similar. I live in Germany and work in Switzerland (I stay in Switzerland during the week). I am classified in German as a Grenzgänger which is sometimes translated into English as "cross-border commuter" (it is not a term that is often needed in the UK of course). It is quite common in Europe (I have a Dutch friend whose sister does ...


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Resident permits and corresponding work permits are based on national laws. So for 3rd country nationals, assume that persons living/working in both Belgium and the Netherlands must deal with both countries. The best advice that can be given, is to go and ask them if a 'practical solution' exists for this scenario (one never knows...) especially for ...


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You are covered by the freedom of movement EU law. The ministery of the interior says you basically only have to register your new residence (as every German would have to do, too, when they move inside Germany) with your local "Meldebehörden" in the city you move to. That would be the "Ordnungs-Amt", the civil administration office. They will make sure the ...


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Can I get residency in NL while carrying on holding a company and being a UK employee? Probably so. But act quickly: you can still move to the Netherlands under EU free movement rules during the rest of this year (2020). It is not yet clear what the situation will be next year, but it is likely to be much more difficult. To establish yourself in the ...


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It is not clear which visa checklist you're looking at. You should be using the visa facilitation checklist for family member of EU, EEA or Swiss nationals. This is an application for a short-stay visa, but strangely it is the correct application for you even if you intend to remain in the Netherlands permanently. The relevant item on the checklist: ...


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You seem to have received confusing and incomplete information. Your situation is dealt with by Directive 2004/38/EC. Below important parts of that directive are explained. For exact text of relevant articles, see link above. A Union citizen is the national of an EU member state. A spouse of a Union citizen is a family member for the purpose of this ...


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Such things aren't required of EU citizens. Your 2003 Dutch textbook was written before Directive 2004/38/EC was enacted, and the law in the Netherlands was different then. I was living in Amsterdam at the time, and I had an English colleague who was stopped by a police officer for crossing the street away from a pedestrian crossing and told that he had to ...


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