Hot answers tagged

6 votes
Accepted

I paid the NHS surcharge. Am I now handled like an "ordinarily resident person"?

It appears the only difference between an ordinary resident and and someone who paid / are exempted from the Immigration Health Surcharge (IHS) seeking NHS services is the access to free assisted ...
  • 539
5 votes

Healthcare in the UK -- would we have access to the NHS?

Whether you are entitled to NHS services or not doesn't depend on your citizenship (not even if you are British), only on where you are ordinary resident. The rules are simple: if you are an ordinary ...
  • 7,449
5 votes

Are my medications available in the UK?

The British National Formulary (https://www.bnf.org) lists all medication prescribable in the U.K. Not all of this is available on the NHS - individual entries indicate drugs which are not ...
  • 151
3 votes
Accepted

Getting a private health insurance in UK

The UK health system is very GP based (and even on top of that nurse based). Most private insurance is "top up" insurance and adds features to the standard NHS care. In London, and some other cities, ...
  • 4,138
2 votes

Residency, NHS entitlements

The main requirement for NHS entitlement is that you are a lawful and settled resident. You'll need your passport and some proof of address in the UK to register with a GP. There is no initial minimum ...
  • 928
2 votes

NHS Surcharge for UK Fiancé

Based on the goverment's site you don't need to pay (or even get an IHS reference number) in any of the following cases: you are applying for a visitor visa from outside of the UK. This includes the ...
  • 7,449
2 votes
Accepted

Clarification of NHS Surcharge (UK Tiered Applicants)

As you correctly point out, while a Tier 1 extension may be granted for two years in certain instances, logically the amount should be £400 total (£200 per year), not £600. Subsequent to 6 April 2015,...
  • 4,598
1 vote

NHS treatment for baby born in the UK staying without visa and costs involved

No visa is required for the child. After 3 months the child can still get treatment from the NHS, but you wil be required to pay the costs yourself at 150% costs. Vaccinations are still free. Chapter ...
  • 3,653

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