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As several people have posted in comments this is not likely to cause a legal problem with employment, it is more a question of how the Poland-UK Double Taxation Convention applies in your specific case. Something you will want to look at closely is the UK laws about taxation on foreign income and even more so at the Polish Laws on taxation on foreign income,...


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For Germany only: If you make the application before the end of the transition period (2020-12-31), then the EU based rules will still apply you will be able to retain your German citizenship without a Retention permit (Beibehaltungsgenehmigung) It would therefore be wise to retain a dated confirmation when the application was made. Any application after ...


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You may not work while in Poland unless authorised under Polish law. There is no general exception for work online or work for a foreign organisation. There is however a fairly long list of cases where a work permit is not required. You might benefit from this, eg if you are in Poland as a university student.


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In principle, your two years in Poland should count towards EU long-term residence but the German implementation of these rules seems very messy. That would not be exactly equivalent to a German Niederlassungserlaubnis and doesn't necessarily help you very much in this case. Specifically, article 16 of Directive 2009/50/EC provides that: By way of ...


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No one answered my question, so I thought I would relay how the process was handled. I was required to sign a contract with a notary which stipulated I was paying my partner around 500 PLN per month. After this we went to the tax office to pay tax on this income (counted over the duration of my existing work permit, which was 3 years). After submitting this ...


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Here is a link to sample tests. An important note here. The B1 level test in Polish is much harder than B1 tests in other languages. Also, some find the test more difficult than it needs to be in general and all tests are filled with questions that may be a bit ambiguous or highly contextual. Whether it's the drivers test, a high school exam, or any test, ...


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To answer your question directly: Yes, you should be authorized to work in the country where you are residing and your prospective's employer question is perfectly legitimate. There is no universal international agreement regarding remote work and Polish law fully applies even to foreign citizens. Beyond that, work may be allowed based on some generic ...


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