10

No, there's no such requirement, the family can choose to either repatriate or bury/cremate locally. Assuming nobody claims the body, local authorities will give the local equivalent of a pauper's funeral and the remains will stay in that country.


7

Most modern televisions have a range of voltages that they support. If you're picking up a new one, you just need to ensure that the voltage range includes that 120V that you get in the US. As most television is transmitted digitally these days, the concern over signal is not important unless you're hoping to get analog signals. The only difference you'd ...


5

The tuner won't receive over-the-air broadcasts in the US. The digital TV standard in use is different. You will have to use some kind of set-top-box for it to work. Also, all the menus and smart features will be in Japanese only. English support is very rare on domestic models. This could be an issue if you want to use things like Netflix, which are ...


5

Keep your existing accounts open If you have no existing credit in the US, get some Pay off your bills on time As a last resort, talk with American Express Keep your existing accounts open If you have existing cards and bank accounts, do not close them all before leaving the country or while abroad. If you do not use the account for months, it may be marked ...


5

Normally when changing employer in the US, your old coverage would continue to the end of the month, and the new coverage start the following month. You don't have such an option and don't have a COBRA option as you are returning from the UK. You need to take out some private short term insurance of your own to cover this situation, for example http://www....


3

The best options we've encountered are truly international schools, where the local emphasis in curriculum is lessened. You can find Americanized schools in various countries, but that's not always going to be possible. International schools tend to focus on world history and International English, instead of mostly local history and local language (which ...


2

What you can do is not get any insurance, and then if an emergency happens during those 12 days, sign up for COBRA, since it will still be within the 60 days after leaving work during which you can sign up for COBRA. If you sign up for COBRA, it will retroactively cover you from when you left work, retroactively covering your emergency. If you don't have an ...


2

Taiwan's citizenship won't be gone without formal renouncement. It's possible to lose Taiwan citizenship involuntary if the citizen acquires mainland China's(PRC) citizenship. Taiwan's current law does allow dual citizenship unless the citizen works for Taiwan's government. She can restore the status pretty easily as long as she has the appropriate ...


2

Nothing prevents you from keeping a US bank account and using a US credit card. You can keep some regular expenses from online services (e.g. Skype credit) tied to the US credit card, which will get you to make regular transactions. Even better, having a US credit card when on home leave allows you to avoid the currency exchange fees on your foreign credit ...


2

The answer to this question depends a lot on the remaining time of your children's school career. If this is one time expat experience for a short time (max 2 years) going to an American school might have benefits. On the other hand you might alienate him/her from both countries. A school is not only a curriculum, it is a lot more then that. You also ...


2

Unless you are prone to injuries or have pre-existing conditions that require medications or hospitalizations I would recommend you not get any for that gap. In most states there are Urgent Care centers, like the one at NYU, which are basically walk-in clinics that allow you to see a doctor get medications and the like. If you do feel that you still want ...


1

The American education system is fragmented and divided, and probably only works as well as it does by preserving each teacher's right and responsibility to develop their own curriculum. Of course, one would expect more American and less British history to be taught in such a school, but it sounds like your son is too young to study that anyway. As with ...


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