7

I don't have a full answer for you, or a full understanding of the situation, but here are a few useful bits of information based on personal experience. The carte de séjour will also serve as a visa after you get it. It will allow you to travel in and out of the country, as well as travel to other Schengen countries (and also to a few non-Schengen ones ...


6

Do you have your decision letter? It should have told you which post office your BRP was to be collected from, or if you were to collect it from your sponsor. Your options if you were supposed to collect it in London and you're not currently in London would be (source): Travel back to the original collection location, pick it up. Find a local Post Office ...


6

Directive 2003/109/EC affords "long-term residents" a right to reside in other EU countries under certain conditions, although three EU countries have opted out of this directive (the UK, Ireland, and Denmark). The answer to your question therefore depends on the EU countries involved. For the remainder of this answer, I assume that both countries have ...


6

According to the OFII website, the part that makes this whole process logical is explained by this: "L’accomplissement de l’ensemble des formalités est attesté par l’OFII par apposition d’une vignette-visa sur votre passeport. C’est cette validation qui donne valeur de titre de séjour à votre visa." "The completion of all the formalities with OFII is ...


6

I am not sure whether it is absolutely impossible to renew the visa but that's not the way it's usually done. The regular process is: long-stay visa to enter then carte de séjour that you renew every year until you get either citizenship (if you want that, obviously) or some way to qualify for a carte de résident or at least a carte de séjour with a longer ...


6

It depends a lot on where you are; There are a few principles that apply to most of the EU, defined in the so-called "return directive" but most of the rules are defined at the national level and implementation might even differ between areas in the same country. Worse case scenario is that you would immediately receive a return decision enjoining you to ...


4

Although the UK referendum is on the 23rd of June, nothing will change immediately regardless of the outcome to vote. If the result is to remain, nothing will radically change any time soon. If the result is to leave: In the short term, nothing will radically change. It will take years to negotiate the new status. The Leave campaign has not provided a ...


4

OK, we have a resolution. I'm sure that no two cases are the same, and so I certainly recommend seeking professional legal advice if you find yourself in a similar situation. That said, here's what we learned. • Fortunately, my friend's company provided her with a lawyer to help navigate her permits (private practice, not in-house) and paid for fees ...


4

Your understanding is correct, there are two routes and your wife would in fact receive a different document in each case, with the EU citizen family member status usually more advantageous in several ways. A civic integration course (or language test as is often required in other countries/situations) should not be required for your wife but you will need ...


4

At the moment (and probably for the next two years), any EU citizen has the right to move to the UK and work there and bring their wife - except UK citizens. But having lived in Spain for 6 to 9 months, you can move to the UK not because you are a UK citizen, but because you make use of your EU citizen's right to move to any EU country, and bring your wife. ...


4

No, you have to apply for a German student visa before you move to Germany. If you cross the border and try to get a Residence permit, you will be denied one as the paperwork in the German side is not available, since you didn't apply for a visa. Getting a German visa inside the EU should not take long (around 2-3 weeks). Additional information from here: ...


4

I don't think you can change just your picture, but according to this link, you can change your non-expired residence card anytime you wish, even if it is not lost or damaged. You will have to pay a 1,300 yen fee. The whole process is documented in the following link. Assuming that you are not changing your name on the card as well, you will need the ...


4

According to item 2-vi in the following link about Revocation of Status of Residence, your residence status is not automatically revoked at the 90 days mark. http://www.immi-moj.go.jp/english/tetuduki/zairyuu/torikeshi.html Where a foreign national staying in Japan with the status of residence listed in the left-hand column of Appended Table I of the ...


3

I found that the times for the resident card are now longer. I don't know if it is normal, but I think that maybe the problem is the amount of requests due to the Brexit is increased. You can call to the Home Office: 0300 123 2241 but probably they will say only that your case is being processed. If the Home Office send you a letter or an E-mail, they ...


3

The Austrian government’s information for foreign citizens: Social Affairs and Emergencies can help guide you, but you’ve already ticked off all the boxes, and more: Filed a police report Reported your passport to your country’s consulate Received a replacement passport (and, best case scenario, you had a copy with all the details) Now, deal with the ...


3

According to Just Landed, there are at least 9-12 telecommunication companies in Belgium. So if this fails, you can try another. However: You can apply for Internet access online or at the chosen provider's store, and you will need to present: your ID or passport proof of address (bill, property rental contract or bank statement) a bank account or ...


3

EEA in this context includes British citizens only if they have been living in another EU/EEA country under freedom of movement rules. Since your spouse has been living in Portugal, you would seem to qualify, though strictly speaking the British spouse must have his or her "centre of life" in the other EU/EEA country to qualify. The relatively brief time ...


3

TL;DR The UK will most likely remain a member of the EU until at least 2018. All of the current EU/EEA laws still apply until that date. No one knows what will happen afterwards. Long answer Although the referendum is passed, nothing much will change overnight. As of 24/06/2016 the current plan is to invoke Article 50 around October 2016. Invoking this ...


3

Nothing will happen if you finally do it. But it's better to do it earlier. I did not notify them about a new job because I was told the employer does it. When I went the following year to the Immigration bureau to extend my visa, they noticed that my current company did not match the registered one. But they just asked me to fill a job change form.


3

A copy of her passport is absolutely useless for crossing borders, and therefore for boarding airplanes. They are simply too easy to falsify. Your best hope would be the European Passport Return Service, but there are conditions for using the service, so it's only an option for you if you meet those conditions. Alternatively, some countries will issue a ...


3

Residence or residency is not a unified concept. A single person can be a resident of different places for different purposes. Two jurisdictions can even consider the same person to be a resident for the same purpose, because of different rules. In general terms, a residence permit authorizes its bearer to reside somewhere, or, more literally, it permits ...


3

As of today, you are the spouse of an EU citizen and are living in a second EU country. Therefore, under the free movement rules, you have the right to work. All you should need to prove this is your marriage certificate (to prove you are married) and your spouse's passport (to prove their citizenship). Of course, whether an employer will accept just ...


3

Formally, EU citizens never need a permit to secure the right to stay in another EU country. They just need to fulfill the conditions defined in the treaties and the secondary law implementing them (directive 2004/38/EC, CJEU case law, national laws and regulations). If you do fulfill these conditions, the country has no discretion and can only ask you to ...


2

My interpretation of the rules is that as a EU citizen living in the UK, under the right circumstances you received unlimited leave to remain in the UK. Now, in 2017, you will want a "document certifying permanent residence". To get this (that's my understanding) you need to prove that you received unlimited leave to remain at any point after 2006, and that ...


2

I actually have never been asked for a residence card in any of my Internet subscriptions and I am currently in the process of changing my Internet connection to a 5th provider (edpnet) (Belgian ISPs are unfortunately not yet on the same level as those in the neighbouring countries :( ) . So I am a bit surprised. Maybe you should not mention your status. I ...


2

For later reference, I have asked the question from two different Ausländerbehörde in Germany. The person only can rely on this law if has not de-registered from Germany to leave it. In that case he has to leave the Germany and apply for job-seeking visa through a consulate. This rules have exception for countries like, US, South Korea and a few more; I ...


2

In response to your question, this is quite a common issue, whereby you have not been stamped in the UK. However coming to apply for your EU Residence Card will not be an issue. You should provide a cover letter as well as airline ticket confirming your entry to the UK. The Home Office will not penalise you for this and in line with the EEA Reg 2006, which ...


2

There are two distinct aspects here: Residence. You cannot generally use EU rules to settle in your spouse's country of origin. There is however an exception to this principle that might apply to you, which leaves you with three different ways to gain the right to live and work in the UK: The regular “spouse“ visa route open to all British citizens' ...


2

From all I can tell it depends on how long you are staying. If you are staying for more than 90 days, then you need to get a residence permit. Sources: Justlanded Germany Residency permits are handled by your local immigration office (Ausländeramt). In order to apply for a residence permit, first register your residence at the local Einwohnermeldeamt (...


2

Documents from non-apostille countries are attested, or confirmed to be legal. In Indonesia, your birth certificate must be legalized by the Ministry of Justice and Human Rights and by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs. A subsequent attestation or legalization may be required by Mauritius and, to be certain, you should check with the Mauritian Consulate in ...


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