15

No. Right now you get a visa, which gives you right to live and work in one particular country. There are plans to change that using EU Blue Card scheme (see also in Wikipedia), but it has not been yet fully implemented. And even so, at this point it's not 100% clear that it will implement freedom of relocation between member states. If the country you'...


14

Settlement (aka indefinite leave to remain, ILR) means you retain your existing nationality, gain the right to live and work in the UK, but do not gain right of abode. To travel outside the UK you would still need to use your existing passport, and acquire visas as a national of your native country where required. You would still use the overseas channel at ...


13

The document referenced in the question is about determining whether are a UK resident or not for tax purposes in a given tax year. That is separate from whether you have right of abode in the UK: "Having right of abode means you’re allowed to live or work in the UK without any immigration restrictions" "All British citizens automatically have right of ...


11

As @vartec explained it's not generally the case. There are several ways non-EU nationals can gain a right to reside elsewhere in the EU: The EU blue card is an attempt at creating an EU residence card for some categories of migrants. It has not been fully implemented and does not cover all EU countries. In any case, it's a new residence permit on top of ...


10

The most significant difference is that as a British citizen, you can apply for a British passport. As a British citizen (with a British passport) you can travel and work in countries where you may otherwise have had to apply for a visa. As you are Australian, you can become a British citizen without losing your Australian citizenship (this is often called ...


10

Because of the old age of your friend it is possibly not be the best option, but people in similar situation try to take the Surinder Singh route. Here they first emigrate to another EU country (like Ireland, Germany or France), where the partner can join them. After residing there for 6 months (so they can no longer be considered a UK resident) they can ...


8

it's different over here :-). Taxation: If you live longer than 183 days in Canada you'll pay your taxes here. You can find the details at the website of the Canada Revenue Agency (http://www.cra-arc.gc.ca/). To open an account you show your ID to the bank and open the account. Should be as simple as that. You need an address to which they can send the ...


7

You had ILR, but have been outside the UK for 2 years. Now you wish to enter the UK as a FAMILY VISITOR and want to know if your ILR is a viable document for that purpose. You did not say your nationality. As you're probably aware by now, you cannot benefit from Paragraph 18 of the rules due to this clause (ii) has not been away from the United Kingdom ...


7

The EU Treaty Article 39 covers the freedom of movement of workers, etc. for member states. The treaty says that each country has to establish laws allowing EU citizens to move around the EU with their family members. One of the stipulations is that this has to not only covered registered spouses, but also non-registered partners. While this was likely ...


7

It appears that, provided you return for at least one night every five years and maintain a private mailbox in the state, South Dakota will happily consider you a resident and issue you a driver license. A number of companies, such as America's Mailbox, offer combined hotel and PMB services for exactly this purpose. These services are commonly used by people ...


7

Forever. US citizens can stay in the US as long as they want.


7

Since you have a British passport, you are very very likely a British citizen, hence you don't need a visa to enter the country, nor would you ever need one. You can simply enter the country with your current British passport, and can also start work, study, etc. immediately. The SRT is to check whether you are a Resident or not, which you are not, and ...


7

Each country defines what it means to be "resident", and for what purpose. Sometimes, a country will define residency as "present in the country for 183 days in a calendar year". Or "6 months", if less precise. Sometimes, a country might define residency as "registered with the local municipality as living in a house". Sometimes, residency for tax purposes ...


7

A residence permit is a card you get from an Ausländerbehörde within Germany, a visa is a sticker you get from a consulate before entering Germany. In general, you are not allowed to apply for a permit if you don't hold a long-stay visa (i.e. if you entered on a short-stay visa or without visa) but there are a number of exceptions. And one of these ...


7

Unfortunately for you, the criteria for the UK ancestry visa are quite clear: Overview You can apply for a UK Ancestry visa if you: are a Commonwealth citizen are applying from outside the UK are able to prove that one of your grandparents was born in the UK are able and planning to work in the UK meet the other eligibility ...


6

Note that the changes only apply for applications for ILR status: Applicants will need to meet the Rules in force at the date of application Once you have obtained the ILR status you are considered settled, and can remain in the country indefinitely, and can usually only lose this status if you commit an offence, or leave the country for more ...


6

The reason they are not willing to sponsor you for PR is that they can find employees who are as good (or better) for the job, but do not come with such requirement. Generally speaking for an employer to go the extra mile for a potential employee, there either must be a shortage or that candidate must be extraordinary. I understand that this may not be ...


6

Directive 2003/109/EC affords "long-term residents" a right to reside in other EU countries under certain conditions, although three EU countries have opted out of this directive (the UK, Ireland, and Denmark). The answer to your question therefore depends on the EU countries involved. For the remainder of this answer, I assume that both countries have ...


5

You can apply for an exemption to the income requirement rule. It is best to get some legal help with this but it can be done on your own just by asking. They are required to consider the exemption and can't simply dismiss it out of hand. Retirement is a good reason to ask for an exemption since clearly is a special case and hopefully he can demonstrate that ...


5

The UKVI guidance seems pretty clear about the date of entry: When your leave is granted, you’ll be issued a 30 day vignette. The vignette is valid for 30 days from the date you said you’d arrive in the UK (even if you arrive at a later date). You’ll have to apply for another 30 day visa if you don’t travel within that 30 days. If the vignette ...


5

Saskatoon is fairly small town (pop. 220K), with no other towns of size anywhere nearby. I don't think you will be able to get a meaningfully lower rent by driving even 150 km. Also, please bear in mind that: Gas in Canada costs about $1/liter, so there is a significant cost to driving that far Winter driving can be very slow and dangerous, particularly ...


5

If the country is a member of the 1954 UN Convention Relating to the Status of Stateless Persons they have to follow the rules of that convention. Read it, and you will know what is required by their laws. BUT, not all member countries have created a formal stateless recognition process so you could end up in a bit of limbo. You can contact the UNHCR ...


5

Your edit seems to have answered your question, and the answer is yes. The relevant directive is 2003/109/EC. It gives you a right to a residence permit in Germany, unless your current country of residence is the United Kingdom, Denmark, or Ireland. These three countries have not implemented the directive. During your period of temporary residence in ...


5

Yes, he can, depending on the country, and without investing in a business or property. Retirees have a certain advantage, as they're not going to work (or allowed to) and their income will support the local economy. Spain, for example, has a retirement visa scheme. For France, you have to apply for the carte de sejour from your home country before ...


5

I am speaking from direct experience with almost this exact situation. She will come under scrutiny and will likely lose her green card if you try this, especially now with immigration coming under a particular focus. A spouse visa isn't even the right type of visa anyway for what you want to do. It is best to get her a 10 visitor visa, unless your wife is ...


5

I'm afraid the only valid answer is to see your Ausländerbehörde and ask them. From my experience, they will accept all kinds of certificates, because they will run their own simple test even if you have a certificate. To quote them: "Yes, well, certificates can be bought." Your best bet is to go ask them, and then don't focus too much on the certificate, ...


4

According to a government site (http://www.migration.gv.at/en/types-of-immigration/temporary-residence.html), "Foreign citizens applying for a residence permit as a researcher and their family members" may "file first applications in Austria" for the residence permit. Presumably you should seek further information from the institution hosting your husband ...


4

Cork has its own GNIB centre in the city-center. No need to go to Dublin. Once you are in Ireland, the GNIB stamp is more important than the visa. So, it does not matter if your wife's visa expires, as long as she has permission from the GNIB office to stay in Ireland.


4

Most important difference would be that as a UK citizen, you have the right to move to and work in any EU country. I may be wrong, but I would think that having indefinite leave to remain in the UK wouldn't give you the right to live in France, Germany, Italy and so on. And if you go on holiday from the UK, you need to check whether you need a visa and get ...


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