6

The way EU law is structured, EU citizens cannot really “overstay” and technicalities like that should not have an incidence on your right to reside in another EU country. Think of it as being late on some paperwork rather than overstaying, that would be closer to the truth. If registering is mandatory (as it is in Denmark) and the host state wants to apply ...


4

No one can give you 100% sure answer. Revokation of Irish citizenship is an extremely rare proceduce. It was done five times to this date. All cases were based on Section 19 (1)(a) "certificate was procured by fraud" of Irish Nationality and Citizenship Act 1956. https://www.independent.ie/irish-news/shane-phelan-there-have-only-ever-been-five-...


4

Nothing with respect to the residence permit. Note that the condition says After having arrived in the Netherlands, you will undergo a medical test for tuberculosis (TB). not that you must be TB-free. This is confirmed by the international help organization in the Hague: It is important to know that even if the test shows that you have TB, this will not ...


3

Can I get Pre-settled status in the UK while still living in the US? No. Settled status is essentially a "grandfathering" system to enable EU citizens to retain rights of free movement after the UK leaves the free movement system. As such, it is only available to EU citizens who reside in the UK. I would like to move back to the UK before ...


3

One solution may be to request a VIPER (VIsto PERmanente, Permanent Visa) (which at first is actually issued for 2 years, after that time you need to apply again to make it properly permanent). It seems to be a lot of hassle though, including transferring some amount of money to a Brazilian account every month, getting an RNE (Brazilian foreigner ID). ...


3

As a UK citizen, with the right to abode, you can return to the UK at any time to take up residence. Important is to insure that your danish residence status is not lost due to an extensive absence (often greater than 6 months) from the country. This is something which you should ask about beforehand (at the immigration office where your residence permit ...


3

Their reply was that "it is not a problem, since [I] have already taken advantage of freedom of movement [by coming to Austria before the end of the transition period]". This seems to imply that because I have been resident since the summer, it does not matter when the official residency certificate is granted. This is correct. You are already an ...


3

If you’re travelling to the UK for less than 14 days, you will be expected to self-isolate for the length of your stay, but you can travel directly to your place of departure. Exceptions from remaining at your place of self-isolation include where: you are travelling directly in order to leave England. Source: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/...


3

But my husband needs to register, is that right? That is correct. If he needs to register, will we need to show some rent agreement? Possibly. See Carte de séjour de membre de la famille d'un citoyen de l'Union/EEE/Suisse. As far as I can tell, though, temporary accommodations should be sufficient, including those obtained through AirBnb. Specifically, ...


2

Your question emphasized that this person would go to a Schengen country but it's important to understand that the Schengen rules legally have no bearing on this whatsoever. While the EU has made it easier to move around and possibly cheat a little, rules around citizenship are still strictly national matters as are, for the most part, rules on long-term ...


2

As far as I know, Portugal requires a person to stay in the country for 5 years to be eligible for applying for a Portuguese passport. I assume you mean: obtaining citizenship, which is a pre-requierment for a Portuguese passport. Then after 1 year due time, he gets a TRC (Temporary Residence Card) and moves to some other country in Schengen (say, ...


2

USCIS is not usually involved in determination whether a permanent resident can return to the US. It would be the immigration officers at entry, part of the CBP, or the immigration judges in immigration court, that would deal with eligibility for entry. USCIS does deal with whether a permanent resident has enough continuous residence to qualify for ...


1

Since you mention France, the residence requirement for naturalisation has been interpreted as having the “center of your life” in France. For example, if you live in France and your spouse and children live abroad, naturalisation can be denied. It's deliberately not about meeting formal criteria (like spending a predefined number of days in France) but by ...


1

This cases are always quite complicated and you better discuss it with a lawyer before making the decision. Looking at this document from OECD it one may think that it would be without tax consequences up to 30 days: https://www.oecd.org/tax/automatic-exchange/crs-implementation-and-assistance/tax-residency/Switzerland-Residency.pdf There may be other ...


1

You MUST be living in the UK on December 31st, 11pm (which is 12pm in the rest of the EU). I would strongly recommend being there a week earlier or better two, in case some jobsworth tries to find a reason to claim you were not actually living there. I wouldn't trust them not to try that. Rent a room from your son for that time and pay him rent (or rent from ...


1

If you have been living in France without interruption since your marriage for more than 3 years, and you have been married for at least 4 years with your French husband, you can apply to naturalize. If you have been living in France for less than 3 years after your marriage, then the following conditions apply: If your French spouse was entered in the ...


1

No. The only things that can prevent interruption of continuous residence (USCIS Policy Manual, Volume 12, Part D, Chapter 3) are: For an absence of between 6 months and 1 year, certain evidence that the applicant maintained ties to the US, like the applicant maintained their job in the US, the applicant's family members remained in the US, the applicant ...


1

Yes, there is no rule against having several residence permit. The Schengen regulations are about visits and short stays and have very little to say on stays longer than 90 days and residence. EU law does have some rules about that but each member state remains largely free to manage immigration as they see fit. Usually what you envision would be difficult ...


1

According to the N-400 instructions (mirror), section "Required Evidence", under "Below is a list of documents to bring with you to your Form N-400 interview.", item 7E (on page 12-13), you need to bring that evidence with you to the interview. It does not say that you need to submit it with your N-400 application. Item 7E (on page 12-13)...


1

From https://citizenpath.com/travel-abroad-affects-citizenship-eligibility/ (mirror) (general answer, not conditioned on satisfying A, C, and D): Disrupting the Continuous Residence Requirement: In general, the following guidelines apply for permanent residents who are traveling abroad: A trip abroad that is less than 6 months will not disrupt continuous ...


1

Yes, you can apply in (most?) areas to enrol in local goverment elections if you are a ratepayer. Often you have to live in Australia as well. e.g https://www.ecsa.sa.gov.au/enrolment/enrol-for-council-elections https://www.vec.vic.gov.au/Enrolment/EnrollingForLocalCouncilElections.html You may have to re-enrol annually, and you will get fined if you enrol ...


1

2020/2021 Update: in my case, in Baden-Württemberg, Ausländerbehörde had explictly noted that I need B1 certificate from Telc, Goethe- Institut or TestDaf. Es muss sich bei dem B1 Zertifikat, um das einer anerkannten Sprachschule handeln.( Hierbei einzig anerkannt sind zertifizierte Träger: Telc, Goethe- Institut oder TestDaf). Demnach kann das Zertifikat ...


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