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Q: What happens if someone works in 10 countries to his retirement? If they happen to be 10 EU countries, then in the last country that person worked in he should apply for pension and get pension combined from all the countries he worked in. As Europa.eu portal explains, if you've worked in several EU countries, you may have accumulated pension rights in ...


7

To move money out of a UK pension fund you have to provide proof that the target fund (where you are intending to move the money to) satisfies UK requirements. The key term here is QROPS (Qualifying Recognised Overseas Pension Scheme). If the target fund is a QROPS (there's a non-exhaustive but fairly comprehensive list here(pdf)) then it can receive the ...


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Yes, he can, depending on the country, and without investing in a business or property. Retirees have a certain advantage, as they're not going to work (or allowed to) and their income will support the local economy. Spain, for example, has a retirement visa scheme. For France, you have to apply for the carte de sejour from your home country before ...


4

Assuming underage you mean younger than the 50 year minimum retirement age requirement: Yes. You will have to provide proof of dependency status, which is usually a marriage certificate. If you are not yet in thailand, each person needs to be able to enter on their own passport. In other words, each dependent over the age of 15 will need a visa or ...


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If you only have state pension you don't really need to do anything if you stay in the EU when you retire. Once you reach the retirement age in the country you have last worked (which might be different to the one where you are resident, in case you never worked there), then they will calculate your pension based on two different ways: Option 1: National ...


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Yes, there are two ways to join them: They are called "ricongiunzione" (sounds like reconjunction) and "totalizzazione" (totalization). From these the second one is free. This page in Italian explains how the latter works.


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Some companies give a match up to a certain percent. That is your employer gives free money equal to what you save in 401k. In that case you are profitable even with the taxes and penalty


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For public pensions/retirement, this is heavily country dependent. As I understand it, it tends to come down to two concepts: 1 - If you have worked in countries that have Totalization Agreements, they tend to do the following: a) You can count most if not all of your service across all of the countries toward your minimum credits/years of work to get ...


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Depending on your current income, contributing to 401k and withdrawing after you're back home may still be beneficial even with taxes and penalties. Consider that there's no tax below personal exemption, if you withdraw that amount every year - you'll just pay 10% penalty, whereas if you don't contribute at all - you'll pay your marginal tax + State tax. If ...


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I would suggest you don't. The reason is that if you leave the US and on an L-1 visa you will likely leave the US when your term is up. The issue is what to do with your funds. The low penalty is usually from one retirement plan to another and you can take a look at options on Schwab, so if you need to roll it over to an account in a foreign country you ...


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You can indeed transfer retirement schemes from Australia to New Zealand. The Australian Taxation Office has a page with details about the retirement savings portability scheme. Trans-Tasman retirement savings portability scheme for individuals - Transfers to New Zealand Points to note: You may only transfer retirement savings between a complying ...


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