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8

It looks like the Maltese consulate consulate made a good call. They wrote: "Your intention to leave the territory of the member state before the expiry of visa could not be ascertained". And it's true, right? You plan to stay on in Malta beyond the end of 90 days given by a Schengen because you plan to work. Given that you have secured permission to ...


8

Do we apply for a Schengen or MVV visa in South Africa to allow my wife to enter the Netherlands? It's not really clear whether they will process your application as an MVV application, but there is certainly evidence that they will process it as a Schengen short-stay application. On the VFS Global site, the page about visiting family notes the fee ...


7

Beside the UK, there are five other non-Schengen EU states: Ireland Romania Bulgaria Croatia Cyprus Ireland, like the UK and to maintain their “common travel area”, opted out of the Schengen area and will not join in the foreseeable future. The common travel area mostly applies to UK and Irish citizens, it does not entail a mutual recognition of all visas ...


7

Clearly, since you are a British citizen, you are under no obligation to leave after 90 days and certainly could not be considered an illegal alien, let alone be banned or removed merely because you still find yourself in the Schengen area. Furthermore, once you have your British passport, the whole issue will become moot. You will be able to leave and enter ...


7

You may want to look at http://ec.europa.eu/dgs/home-affairs/what-we-do/policies/legal-migration/long-term-residents/index_en.htm as well; this is the page describing long term residency for the general public rather than for a law audience. The German permanent resident is entitled to a residence permit in another EU country, but does not immediately ...


7

You really need a lawyer to deal with this. The best solution to know about your options and find a lawyer is to approach a refugee support group like the ones mentioned by Zach. As far as your immediate situation go, you have to read the letter very carefully. Typically, what happens is that you applied for protection and the authorities have determined ...


6

You need to obtain this “attestation d'accueil” from the municipal authorities (“à la mairie”) where you live. It's supposed to prove that you have enough space and financial means to accommodate the person (and will consequently reduce the financial means requirement for the Schengen visa). You will need to fill in a form (you can download a sample form ...


6

A few years ago, roaming within Europe was quite expensive. Since then, the European Commission have identified roaming as a notable impediment to the single market, so have been taking some strong steps to remove roaming as a problem. As of the 1st of July 2014, the maximum allowed roaming rates for an EU phone in another EU country have dropped again, and ...


6

No, whether you can directly apply for a residence permit from within the country is entirely up to each individual country and will not necessarily change after Colombian and Peruvian citizens are exempted from the Schengen visa requirement. There is no link between this and the Schengen regulations and no general rule that would apply in all Schengen ...


5

The rules you are referring to stem from directive 2003/109/EC and are wholly unrelated to the Schengen regulations (summary here). So they do apply to some non-Schengen countries (Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia, Cyprus) but not even to all of them. Unfortunately, the UK and Ireland have opted out from it. From the motivation of the directive itself: (25) In ...


5

You cannot really “overstay” in the way third-country citizens can. As a British citizen, the most that can happen if you stay longer than 3 months without doing anything in another EU country is the following: You might be asked to leave. You might have to pay a fine if you failed to complete some formalities. The rest of the answer will explain how all ...


5

Germany only allows people from very few countries (e.g. the US, South Korea, or Australia) to apply for a residence permit from within the country. People from other countries – including Iran and all countries whose citizens need a Schengen visa for short stays in Germany – need to apply for a long-stay visa from a German consular post abroad. I am not ...


5

The rules are very strict, if you have used your 90 days, you should be denied entry unless you had some sort of long-stay visa (e.g. a partner visa for Germany or a working holiday visa somewhere), at least if the border guards notice it. If there are some days left (that would depend on the exact date you left in May), the 167 days do not matter as such. ...


5

Since you have a Dutch long-stay visa (MVV means temporary or provisional residence permit and is what is called a long-stay or type D visa in the Schengen regulations), you can visit Germany under the same terms than if you had a Schengen visa. This means among other things that you should only be visiting, should have sufficient financial means, health ...


5

Foreigners who want to marry in Germany have to show documents from their homeland that they can legally marry, e.g. that there are no previous marriages or that they are properly divorced. Getting those documents on short notice could be difficult. Marriages for the sole purpose of gaining immigration status (Scheinehe) may be dissolved by the courts, using ...


5

Yes, he can, depending on the country, and without investing in a business or property. Retirees have a certain advantage, as they're not going to work (or allowed to) and their income will support the local economy. Spain, for example, has a retirement visa scheme. For France, you have to apply for the carte de sejour from your home country before ...


5

Yes. I did this. I did a 2 year engineering degree and my wife lived with me. I showed that I had plenty of resources to support her, and she didn't work. I did not bring her into France later, she was accepted for her long-term visitor's visa at the same time as I was accepted for my student visa. Again, her visa does not allow her to work.


5

As counter-intuitive as it might seem to you, the German police's decision to deny entry makes sense. You were actually entering Germany, that's why you had to cross passport control in Frankfurt. Because of the way the Schengen area is organised, there is no sharp distinction between entering Germany and transiting to another Schengen country, tickets to ...


5

I have gone through a similar process to move to the Netherlands from the UK with my girlfriend who is an EU citizen. Since we are not married, my answers might be slightly different from what you would go through but I'd like to offer any help anyway as I know how stressful this process could become :) Do we apply for a Schengen or MVV visa in South ...


5

There is no easy way to extend visa-free entry. Generally an extension is only allowed if you cannot leave the Schengen area (force majeure) or you can provide “proof of serious personal reasons”. Otherwise you have to leave and re-enter, respecting the 90/180 day rule. You could consider applying for a long-stay visa from your country of residence before ...


4

Her being the widow of an EU citizen does not help, extended family not so much either. For a direct ascendant or descendant (i.e. father/mother/children), it's possible to obtain a residence permit from one of the member states under certain conditions. You will still need to deal with paperwork and renew it from time to time. Most importantly, depending on ...


4

I would not say that getting a student visa is “easy” (I would expect quite a bit of bureaucracy) but the earlier Schengen visa should not be a problem. Legally speaking, short-stay Schengen visas and long-stay national visas are very different, for example the 90-day limit and the requirements laid out in the Schengen regulations (insurance, financial means)...


4

Answering my own question to say what happened. Since I was only planning to stay in Germany for marginally more than 90 days, the Ausländeramt just gave me a Grenzübertrittbescheinigung that lets me stay until the end of the term at the institute I'm visiting. (This is less paperwork hassle and certainly cheaper than getting either a work permit or a long-...


4

Being a citizen of a Schengen country provides no benefits, the Schengen rules mostly impact people from elsewhere in the world. Being an EU citizen on the other hand has many consequences. Using that search phrase should give you much more information. Two big things come to mind: Much simpler formalities and stronger right to stay in the country. ...


4

No, you cannot apply for a work permit (which is residence permit) while being in Germany on a visitor visa. Citizens of the USA, Australia, Canada, Israel, Japan, New Zealand, Switzerland, as well as EU citizens may apply for their residence permit after entering the Schengen territory without a visa. Citizens of other countries must apply and ...


3

According to Statsforvaltningen: As an EU citizen you may freely enter Denmark and remain in this country for up to 3 months without an EU residence document (registration certificate). It goes on to say: If you expect that your stay in Denmark will last more than 3 months, you have to apply for an EU residence document before the expiry of the three ...


3

You do need a German residence permit (or a long-stay visa and/or authorization to work, as appropriate). As a U.S. citizen, you can apply for it from within the country but you are not allowed to work without it. In general, a Finnish residence permit does not make any difference in this scenario. In particular, it does not grant you any right you don't ...


3

Not exactly your question but it's relevant to it and a bit long for a comment. Schengen visas never allow work in the whole area, nor do they forbid it as such. But if you are from outside the EU and want to take up employment in a Schengen country, you need some form of authorisation to work from that particular country, on top of the authorisation to ...


3

According to OP: Well! I got the spouse visa, but the Danes sure took their time. It was granted 6 months after the application! The delay was the most unpleasant thing ever! But it was all good in the end! Sorry for the 'very' late reply though!


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