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13

It's relatively easy, yes, but there are several caveats: You need to become a resident in France before you apply (and this requirement is assessed more broadly than residence for, say, tax purposes). It's reasonably easy if you have family/marry someone (a registered partnership or PACS is good too), not so much if you want to qualify for a work permit ...


10

Your nephew is not automatically barred from applying for a student visa for the UK. However, the visa application will ask: Have you ever been deported, removed or otherwise required to leave any country, including the UK? [source] It will be up to UK immigration authorities as to how, if at all, the US overstay will affect the visa decision.


10

There is no guaranteed way. The most common path is this: Work on OPT after graduation (OPT is 12 months, can be extended to 29 months for STEM majors, during which you can work for a company in your field of study; there are certain restrictions, like you cannot have more than 90 days without work) Then find a company to sponsor you for H1b work visa ...


8

It's difficult to know exactly what happened. It's entirely possible that you met some rude people and that miscommunication made things worse or that your interlocutors felt bad about the situation for some reason and reacted aggressively as a result. You already received some good advice on how to approach similar situations and avoid unpleasant ...


7

I do not find this weird. I am not arguing on the rudeness, I tend to think French people may be rude for no reason. But you should understand that in France, administration and responsibilities are really divided into roles. And one role is fulfilled by one person. Asking a school administration for train discount cards is not expected, I would even ...


6

Sorry, but unless this escalates into violence or sexual harassment, I'm afraid you likely have little to no legal recourse. "Power harassment" (パワハラ) and authoritarian bosses like yours are endemic in Japan, and since you're a student, even employment laws and the usual channels for dealing with it don't apply. You have essentially two options, both of ...


5

To buy a UK car in the United Kingdom you need: A valid UK address. This is so both the DVLA and the Insurance company you chose will know where you live. This should be permanent, as any time you move you have to update this record with both of them. Money. To buy the car, vehicle tax and insurance. Valid driving licence. Otherwise you won't be able to ...


5

No. According to the DHS, to maintain your F student status: You must take a full course of study each term; if you cannot study full-time, contact your DSO immediately. According to the USCIS's OPT Q&A, Students authorized to participate in pre-completion OPT must work part-time while school is in session. They may work full time when school is ...


5

Can I freely drop my studies and stay in Canada to work until the end of my student visa? No. Does it appear like I am lying to the government? It doesn't appear. You are. Can I get into trouble for that? Of course. Does it decrease my chances to later apply for another visa or for permanent residency? Most definitely.


5

The system in the UK is confusing. As far as I can tell the Scotish system is different from the English, Welsh and Northern Irish systems. I assume you are talking about the government finances and not private loans. The requirements for qualifying are available from GOV.UK: You can only apply if: you’re a UK national or have ‘settled status’ (no ...


5

CIC's official website clearly says that you MUST stay in Canada while you have an implied status. Quoting from CIC: You must stay in Canada and meet the conditions of your original work permit. If you applied for a work permit extension before your work permit expired, you can keep working under the same conditions as your existing permit until CIC ...


5

Since nobody with more knowledge has answered: You were apparently honest about what you intended to do, but did not realize it was not permitted. That means you have not damaged your credibility. If you have the paperwork, there may be a reference number that will be useful on your future applications. In any case, be careful to fill in the application ...


5

Yes. I did this. I did a 2 year engineering degree and my wife lived with me. I showed that I had plenty of resources to support her, and she didn't work. I did not bring her into France later, she was accepted for her long-term visitor's visa at the same time as I was accepted for my student visa. Again, her visa does not allow her to work.


4

There's no maximum amount of time you can work as an intern. As long as you're complying with the F1 requirements (including being in good standing with your school and various degree-related and course-work related requirements) - you can work as many days as you wish. However, there's a difference between full-time and part-time internships. Part time (up ...


4

1) No, you do not need to pay taxes for money your parents send to you; they have already been taxed. It is not counted as income, as you do not perform any work to get this. 2) This should be taxed in some country, either Russia or Sweden. As pointed out, it is hard to track, but "Skatteverket" might be curious about where money on your Swedish bank ...


4

The main sources of financial help available to students in France are: A Bourse de l'enseignement supérieur sur critères sociaux is a means-tested scholarship (eligibility is based on your parents' income). It can be available to foreign students under certain conditions (e.g. if you worked in France before or if your parents live there) but probably not ...


4

Short answer - NO, not without first getting Advance Parole. DO NOT leave the U.S. without the Advanced Parole Document! If you do, your application will be considered abandoned & you just wasted a bunch of time and money. Since you didn't apply for this along with the Adjustment of Status application, it is a separate process (Form I-131) with a ...


4

This article about such a project in Cologne calls it "Wohnen für Hilfe". wohnenfuerhilfe.info lists similar projects in other cities and there is even a site linking similar “homeshare” initiatives in other countries. There are no details about any contract but apparently it's not a private initiative or a one-to-one agreement but typically something ...


4

If you haven't forgotten or misunderstood anything, I don't see any reason to worry. In actual fact, even entry denials are not recorded or shared across EU countries. You would get a stamp in your passport and that would be all. There is no “passport record” where this information would be recorded, at least no Europe-wide record or database (conceivably ...


3

Not exactly your question but it's relevant to it and a bit long for a comment. Schengen visas never allow work in the whole area, nor do they forbid it as such. But if you are from outside the EU and want to take up employment in a Schengen country, you need some form of authorisation to work from that particular country, on top of the authorisation to ...


3

You need to get an employment authorization document (a.k.a. EAD, Form I-766, "work permit"), for that you need to talk to your school's international students' office. They'll add the appropriate note to your immigration paperwork and it will be counted as part of your 20hrs/week on-campus employment. That is, of course, if the type of job is qualified. ...


3

In Canada, colleges are more known for education than Universities, and as you have your bachelor's degree in computer science, it is first stepping stone for Post Graduate Certificate program (2 Years) because you already have earned your bachelor's degree. wasting 3 years in diploma program will be not worth it. I have spent my time in Canada as an ...


3

Also a 1st year PhD student in France, also can't speak French. Also had very similar experiences. You really need to abuse google and university resources and find out precisely what you need in order to get things done. There's a very strict 'way' of doing things in France, and typically people will be happy to do their part of these things for you, but ...


3

Aside from what's listed on the official ISIC site, you can usually get a 50% discount at most Czech museums and exhibitions. Some student parties might also have free entry for those with a valid ISIC card. And some bus companies have a small discount for those with an ISIC. Nothing related to accommodation or public transport, though, as that usually ...


3

Turns out you can apply for an extract from the border crossing system at the Service Agency, which, in Tbilisi, is located at Petre Kavtaradze Street 5a. Takes a few days to issue.


3

Your first place to look for this kind of information is the Statistics Canada website. For the 2006 census, it had information on employment by industry in each census metropolitan area (CMA), although I'm not sure whether it had the same in 2011. There should also be information about average wages in different CMAs, possibly per industry. If there isn't a ...


3

In California you can apply for a driver's license without a SSN if you can prove legal presence (e.g. an F visa) but are ineligible for a SSN. Once you become eligible for a SSN you must obtain one and provide it to the DMV when you renew your license (which you will do frequently since California licenses for non-immigrants expire when their current legal ...


3

To request the certificate of equivalence, you and your friend have to follow this link (preferably not using Firefox, which makes the website buggy). He will have to give his identity and an email address. This address is important because it is where the certificate will be sent to him. After that, you’ll be asked a few questions and finally, you’ll have ...


3

Regarding your edit: "Lawful permanent resident" does not include US citizens. It is a term of art in US immigration law that denotes what most people call "green card holder." For example, the US Department of Homeland Security has a page, Lawful Permanent Residents (LPR), which begins by saying: Lawful permanent residents (LPRs), also known as “green ...


3

OPT requires getting an EAD card, so that you can work for any employer. The application for an EAD, I-765, has long processing times, sometimes taking 5-6 months these days. CPT, on the other hand, does not involve getting an EAD. When working on CPT, your I-20 authorizes you to work for a specific employer. Your school can issue the I-20 fairly quickly.


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