8

Yes, that should be possible. From bmf.gv.at (Austrian Ministry of Finance) Kosten zum Erwerb von Fremdsprachenkenntnissen sind abzugsfähig, wenn man die Sprache im Beruf benötigt (zB als Sekretär, Telefonist, Kellner, Hotelangestellte oder Exportsachbearbeiter). Als Fremdsprache gilt jede von der Muttersprache verschiedene Sprache, gegebenenfalls ...


5

As you know, because you have a history of being able to claim the FEIE and continue to reside in China, you meet the bona fide and physical presence tests for the FEIE. You of course must meet these tests every time you want to claim the exemption. But that's not what you're asking about. Can income from a US employer to a US employee count as "foreign ...


3

If you meet the physical presence test, you are entitled to the exclusion regardless of the visa you are on. I can't answer with respect to your Chinese tax obligation. There are many countries that do not have an income tax; were you to work in one of them and meet the physical presence test and your income was under the excludable limit you would not owe ...


3

Disclaimer: I'm not a lawyer and this is no legal advise In Germany income tax is based on your personal income, no matter from where it stems. So if you've earned money during 2016 abroad they take this into account to determine the tax percentage for your income tax 2016 in Germany eg if you've earned 100€ abroad and 100€ in Germany you have to pay the ...


3

In general, except for rare cases, you can only get an SSN when you are authorized to work. People on J-2 (including both spouses and children of the J-1) have the option to apply for EADs (note that it is not cheap; the fee for I-765 is $410), in which case after they get the EADs they would be authorized to work and can get SSNs based on that; but without ...


2

You can calculate your taxes using this webpage of the Norwegian tax authority: https://skattekalkulator.app.skatteetaten.no - switch to English in the upper right corner. This uses the same engine as the actual tax calculation, it should be correct. Norway has only few rules that give benefits to married people; every married couple is automatically taxed ...


2

Assuming you are paying tax via pay as you earn (PAYE) indeed, the monthly net income should be the annual net income divided by 12. You seem to have been confused by the personal allowance. Yes, the "first £12,500" you earn in a year is "tax free", but in order to avoid pay cheques varying month-to-month, HMRC estimates how much your annual income will be ...


2

You are right that net means what you get on your account, health coverage, social security and retirement contributions are deducted. You still have to pay income taxes on that net income. The exact amount to pay as income tax will greatly vary depending on the fact that your family is actually included (personnes à charges, revenu du foyer) or not, I am ...


2

When they ask you to declare your income in Azerbaijan, you don't need to provide evidence that you cannot provide - what you say will be taken as true unless there is a reason to believe that you are lying. Of course not saying the truth would be tax evasion and a very serious matter. And if the tax office thinks you should have the evidence then they can ...


2

For US taxes, you'll be able to utilize the capital gains tax exemption as long as you've lived in the house as your primary residence for 2 of the previous 5 years, which means you have 3 years to decide what to do. For Canadian taxes, you don't have to pay capital gains taxes on a home for any period of time it was your permanent residence. Calculating it ...


2

I have had the experience of getting the 30% ruling a while after I started working - so retroactive requests are not a problem (though they might be if you cross the boundary of a tax year; not sure about that point). However, [edit] a Master's degree and being under 30 merely reduce the salary minimum to apply the 30% ruling. As explained, for example, ...


2

German tax office wants your world wide income to calculate the rate at which you are taxed for your German income. So you will pay more tax the higher your foreign income. On the other hand, not stating your foreign income would be tax evasion. On the other hand, you don't need to prove your income, you have to make them believe what you say. (To ...


1

TL;DR: You'll probably need to pay, but see a lawyer if it's a lot of money. Did anyone face this problem before and what did you do? Not this specific problem and not in the Netherlands, but I do have a bit of Israeli experience, both w.r.t. my own taxes and my limited legal background, on both of which I'll base my answer. Who should be responsible ...


1

With this type of expenses it is always worth trying, so do as user149408 says in their comment and Save all your receipts and include the expenses, properly documented, in your first tax return as "Werbungskosten". State that they were related to a relocation for work reasons. After that, it's up to the tax office to decide if they will refund you any ...


1

Yes, the excluded income counts towards the filing requirement. From IRS Publication 54, Chapter 1, Section "Filing Requirements": For purposes of determining whether you must file a return, gross income includes any income that you can exclude as foreign earned income or as a foreign housing amount. So in your example, yes, you would be required to file....


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