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Disclaimer: I have never had to deal with US Taxes. For me, listening to such stories and general reading about this topic is like watching a vampire horror movie on television - knowing that they will never get out of the screen. I do remember statements being made that corrections to an existing tax return can be made. The advice generaly given was ...


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Usually you would find the detailed explanation in the "Technical Explanation" or another similarly named document coming with the treaty. Unfortunately, the IRS site doesn't list such a document for Romania. For other countries, the date of arrival is usually the first date of arrival in the capacity referred to in the article, with some treaties ...


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To answer my own question. I spoke with the tax professional at my workplace and the information is the following: I don't pay any taxes retroactive. I begin paying taxes as soon as my status has officially changed (the start date of the green card).


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What decision are you referring to? Did the IRS notify you of your resident alien status? In 2014 it seems like based on the amount of time you spent in the US, you were already a nonresident alien and wouldn't have needed to use an exception.


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No, both articles do not apply. Scholarship is not salary, so only 20(3) applies. The treaty doesn't seem to provide an "opt-out" option, so no - you cannot choose to not apply the treaty in the period of scholarship to be able to apply it in the following period of salaried employment. Generally, in legaleese, "shall" or "will" mean that there's no other ...


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Mark Johnson's answer is essentially correct. The income you're speaking of is not likely to be interest income, but the same principle applies: you can file an amended return. To answer the questions posed in the body of the text: Should I have mentioned that I own stock in the company I work for? Since the tax is an income tax, you do not need to ...


1

Yes. According to Indian tax laws you are required to pay taxes on salary you earned while working in India. However you can claim a tax credit on the amount when you file your USA taxes. This assumes you are an Indian citizen.


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Money received as a gift might not be income, under the IRS rules. In general, income is money received for work or through investments. The IRS is very clear: income from abroad is taxable, for both resident aliens and US citizens. Your individual circumstances will determine whether you need to consult a tax attorney to ensure that you are reporting ...


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I'm not an expert on this subject, but from what I understand there are generally two ways to do this. Have the company establish a subsidiary company in the foreign country and make your husband an employee of that subsidiary Your husband establishes his own company in foreign country and operates as an independent contractor. This interesting article ...


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Well, I know someone in exactly the same situation who is wondering exactly the same thing. As far as I understand -- I am not a certified tax expert, and this is not a consultation. According to the Glacier tax system (an electronic system in use at some universities), you would count as a resident alien for taxation purposes for tax year 2016 if you had ...


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As it turns out, my wife could get an ITIN only if she was going to be claimed as an exemption for my taxes. The IRS doesn't seem to deliver ITIN for any other reason, so we waited for my "treaty rights" to be exhausted, and filled out an application when we did our taxes the next time. Maybe there is another way to proceed, but it seems that you can't get ...


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