Hot answers tagged

19

Yes, it's possible, the term of the art is perpetual traveller ("PT"). Basically, since many countries allow you to visit for up to six months without being considered a "resident", you can arrange your life so that your income is earned by a company in a low-to-no-tax country (eg. Singapore, which has multi-year 0% startup schemes and hefty exemptions ...


18

There's a lot more to tax residence in most countries than a simple time limit. For Germany, for example, there are other specific triggers, other than the 6 consective month rule. One would be having an abode in Germany. Covered in reasonable detail in this KPMG report (pdf). Tax residence generally implies you have to pay tax to that country on your ...


18

The US taxes all its citizens. Where you live is of no consequence for that fact. You may be eligible for tax treaty benefits, or foreign earned income exclusion, but you're still liable to the US for your taxes and must submit a tax return if you qualify for any benefits or exclusions and want to claim them. Otherwise you're taxed the same (or ...


17

No, if you never watch any kind of Live TV, nor the BBC iPlayer, you don't need to pay the TV Licence fee. This means that you will not be able to watch any kind of Live TV, even if it's not the BBC (like ITV, Channel4, Sky, etc. - also this includes online live streaming as well). You also cannot watch the BBC iPlayer (neither the live nor the on-demand ...


16

The question is actually also relevant for German catholics who for some reasons want to leave the church. My understanding is that in canon law and catholic theology, this is simply not possible. In German law, it definitely is, the German states do not endorse the Roman Catholic Church's view of who is a catholic or not and do not ask for any proof beyond ...


15

You're a US citizen, subject to US tax disclosure requirements. (Even expatriates are subject to this.) US law requires banks dealing with US citizens to inform the Internal Revenue Service of certain information. In this case, the W-9 form will provide the IRS with some information about your tax obligations in France, which will help them determine if ...


13

The US doesn't have a "tax residency/non-residency" notion for its citizens/permanent residents. If you're a US citizen/permanent resident - you're considered to be under the US tax jurisdiction, wherever you are and wherever you get your income from. However, the US law allows certain ways to avoid double taxation (for example, foreign tax credit or ...


13

If you are mobile and prepared to pick a place based on taxes, you might be able to use that to your advantage but it's certainly not as easy as moving around and ensuring you never stay more than X days in a given place. You need to pay attention to several things: Income can be taxable where it is generated. In many countries, if you have a work contract ...


13

The form is pretty simple. You put your name, SSN and address and confirm that you're a US tax person, and give it to the bank. What's probably a surprise for you is that you are a US tax person. You need to file your annual tax returns, FBAR, and pay taxes (if the foreign earned income exclusion and foreign tax credit don't cover everything) to the US ...


13

No, you cannot avoid the licence fee because you don't want to watch TV. The official website does not merely imply it but it states it pretty unambiguously, in German and in a few other languages too, including (broken) English: A simple rule applies for all citizens since 2013: one residence - one fee. The licence fee is not linked to a broadcasting ...


12

You will need to cancel your US Citizenship and much more beyond that. You will have to: Move abroad and make your new home in a (lower/no-tax) foreign nation so you are no longer a “resident” for U.S. income taxes; Obtain alternative citizenship and passport; Give up U.S. citizenship and change your legal “domicile” to avoid U.S. estate taxes; Arrange ...


12

In the United States, individual States tax residents and non-residents. Many States tax residents on worldwide income, but non-residents are generally taxed on income sourced in that State only. So if you're not a Kansas resident, then you only pay KS taxes on income you received in KS. Kansas defines tax resident as follows: A Kansas resident for ...


12

What's for me the best option for paying taxes? On time, preferably electronically. That would be the best option. I'm not going to spend more than 3 months in 1 country. That means you'll have to pay taxes to at least 4 different countries at any give year... I suggest you talk to tax advisers familiar with the relevant countries' tax laws to plan ...


11

The $10K limit is aggregate. You might have had a filing obligation in prior years as well, if the total of all of your accounts together in any one day was $10K or more. If you have more than $10K on a single account - yes, you're required to file FBAR, and you're required to list all of your accounts. Pay attention: FBAR is not only for classical bank ...


11

Most countries don't tax their citizens, only their residents. The most notable exception is the US. In the EU countries however you only need to pay tax if you are a resident there. More specifically in Italy: If you live in Italy for more than 183 days in a year, or your life is centered in Italy and you are in the Population Registry: You must pay tax on ...


11

Yes, you do. Every American citizen does. The new law has nothing to do with it, you were subject to the American taxation your whole life. The new law just makes it harder for you to ignore it. You'll have to file a yearly tax return (IRS form 1040), and check, considering the foreign income exclusion (form 2555) and foreign tax credit (form 1116) whether ...


10

Each country where you are working, contracting or residing might try to tax some or all of your income based on the local rules and those are not fully unified even in the European Union. Worse case scenario, you could be taxed several times for the same income. Some countries like the US will also want a bite at the apple as long as you are a citizen, no ...


10

If you are an employee, then you'll get your P60 form around the end of the tax year (5th April). Usually (if you are a basic employee, e.g. not self-employed or similar) you don't have to do anything with that. More information on the gov's site. Also you should get a payslip every time you are paid (either on paper or electronically), where you can check ...


10

If you are employed through a company in Georgia you most likely have to pay taxes there. See this from Georgia's Department of Revenue website FAQs. Q: What are the filing requirements for a nonresident who works in Georgia and/or has other Georgia source income? A: Nonresidents, who work in Georgia or receive income from Georgia sources and are ...


10

The Canada Revenue Agency has a specific page for newcomers. In short: You become a tax resident of Canada on the day you arrive and intend to settle For the part of the tax year that you were NOT a resident of Canada you pay Canadian income tax on Canadian source income (probably none, as you don't have Canadian income yet) For the part of the tax year ...


10

I've also found this link which states so as long you physically worked out of the country you qualify. Perhaps it is left up to interpretation but it seems there is reason to believe based on research that income earned abroad no matter whence it comes is considered foreign-source. U.S.-Source vs. Foreign-Source Income Determination of whether ...


10

You must report gifts from foreign persons in excess of $100K annually on form 3520 attached to your tax return. There's no tax, only reporting, but failure to report will trigger a $10000 penalty. Note that related persons are not excluded from this requirement, so while transfer between spouses which are both US residents are exempt from gift tax and ...


9

The proposed salary is almost spot on what is referred to as 'modaal inkomen', or the median income: the most common income in the country. Therefore, you should be able to live on this salary just fine! But it really all depends on your lifestyle, of course. Keep in mind there are other things that will be taken out of your salary too, like in most ...


8

If you want to stay in the EU, you could try Bulgaria, income tax is flat at 10 percent, the cost of living is relatively low too, even in the capital. I'd personally recommend a place like Veliko Turnovo, which is an historic town that boasts a relatively young population due to its university and has a sizeable community of expats (most notably British ...


8

Yes, that should be possible. From bmf.gv.at (Austrian Ministry of Finance) Kosten zum Erwerb von Fremdsprachenkenntnissen sind abzugsfähig, wenn man die Sprache im Beruf benötigt (zB als Sekretär, Telefonist, Kellner, Hotelangestellte oder Exportsachbearbeiter). Als Fremdsprache gilt jede von der Muttersprache verschiedene Sprache, gegebenenfalls ...


8

As the same gross salary can and will result in very different net payments to the employee, it does not make much sense to discuss salaries in 'net'. In any job description or offer, and in most discussions, salaries mentioned are therefore gross values. It depends of course of the circumstances - a job that somebody currently has results in a well defined ...


8

It is supposed to work like this: You leaving the church is automatically reported to the tax office (Finanzamt), which will update your entry in the ELStAM database. The next time your employer processes your salary, it retrieves your updated information from ELStAM and won’t withhold church tax. In your case, something went wrong apparently. You should ...


7

It seems possible in principle but there are several restrictions. Particularly relevant is the fact that any period of residence in the Netherlands in the past 25 years would be subtracted from the period during which you can benefit from the 30%-rule. The relevant status is article 10ef of the Uitvoeringsbesluit loonbelasting 1965 (I got the reference ...


7

I suspect that from the perspective of the French tax office, any form they send you is a convenience, you are still legally responsible for submitting all required information on your own. Since there is no general registration system in France, the best is to contact the tax office directly and give them your new address as soon as you have one: Afin de ...


7

Generally excellent source for such information is Glassdoor. They provide information on salaries and reviews of companies. It's especially useful for US based companies, but provides some info for companies elsewhere. As for your particular case, it seems that for web developer in Calgary range is $44,000 - $70,000 with median of $55,000 (Canadian ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible