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5

The only document you need to submit to indicate that you're filing a joint tax return is the tax return itself. If you were married in 2019, the first tax return for which you'll do this is your 2019 tax return, due in April 2020. If you were married earlier this month then you'll have to wait a year; your filing status for your 2019 returns will remain ...


4

Disclaimer: I have never had to deal with US Taxes. For me, listening to such stories and general reading about this topic is like watching a vampire horror movie on television - knowing that they will never get out of the screen. I do remember statements being made that corrections to an existing tax return can be made. The advice generaly given was ...


3

For anyone curious, I discovered that Australia and UK have a Double Taxation Treaty that allows for this kind of thing so long as you're only staying less than 183 days for a calendar year and/or tax year. https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/australia-tax-treaties There are a few exceptions here and there, but article 14 (details 1 and 2 combined ...


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No, an H4 child is not authorized to work in the US, and thus, cannot generally get a Social Security Number. One is generally only eligible to get an SSN for the first time (i.e. if one doesn't have an SSN before) if one is authorized to work in the US. SSNs for people who are not authorized to work are only granted in rare circumstances, which I don't ...


2

That's the tax. In addition, my annual tax certificate has deductions for: Beiträge AHV/IV/EO/ALV/NBUV – Cotisations AVS/AI/APG/AC/AANP – Contributions OASI/DI/IC/UI/NBUV Berufliche Vorsorge/2. Säule - Prévoyance professionnelle/2e pillier - Company pension plan/2nd pillar 10.1 Ordentliche Beiträge – Cotisations ordinaires – Regular ...


2

When you say 'each conversation ends when Canada is mentioned' I hope it isn't too abrupt an ending. I'm assuming that you're told that their practice doesn't deal too much about Canadian tax. It would be nice if they could provide a reference to some one in their profession who does. These other telephone calls, where there are questions, are ...


2

You should answer "yes". Between January and June of 2018 you lived abroad. I don't know what the exact definition of "extended period of time" is, but six months will be included. I think you will need to engage the services of a Steuerberater[in]. The one we uses charges on the basis of our income, and saves us more in additional allowances than we pay ...


2

Your status with respect to federal income tax depends on when you enter the US and on your presence during the previous two tax years (because of the substantial presence test). See Determining Alien Tax Status and Alien Residency - Green Card Test on the IRS website. From the latter: If you meet the green card test at anytime [sic] during the calendar ...


2

You can calculate your taxes using this webpage of the Norwegian tax authority: https://skattekalkulator.app.skatteetaten.no - switch to English in the upper right corner. This uses the same engine as the actual tax calculation, it should be correct. Norway has only few rules that give benefits to married people; every married couple is automatically taxed ...


2

This really depends. Taxes are lower in Germany but Munich has become very expensive to live in, even compared to Oslo. However, Norway includes its health insurance and better pension benefits in its taxes which come on top in Germany. Oslo is much smaller than Munich, therefore commutes are typically shorter but this depends on where you would live and ...


2

Assuming you are paying tax via pay as you earn (PAYE) indeed, the monthly net income should be the annual net income divided by 12. You seem to have been confused by the personal allowance. Yes, the "first £12,500" you earn in a year is "tax free", but in order to avoid pay cheques varying month-to-month, HMRC estimates how much your annual income will be ...


2

According to §551 BGB, the interests on the deposit belong to the tenant (except some cases, f.e. student dorms). Landlords have no rights on it (and they must save deposit separated from their own money).. The percentage is just a usual bank percentage, so maybe 0.5% a year nowadays or even less.


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In the case of Sweden, the agreement is that someone residing in Sweden but with income from Germany pays taxes in Sweden on that income, but the german taxes is deducted from the ones payable in Sweden. The rule is that you don't need to pay taxes two times on the same income. I suggest that you contact the Skattecenter in Köpenhavn. http://skat.dk/


2

Mark Johnson's answer is essentially correct. The income you're speaking of is not likely to be interest income, but the same principle applies: you can file an amended return. To answer the questions posed in the body of the text: Should I have mentioned that I own stock in the company I work for? Since the tax is an income tax, you do not need to ...


2

If either the permanent resident or the citizen is changing his/her name as a result of the marriage, that partner will need to obtain a new social security card, as well as all the other steps in changing one's name. If either or both partners are employed, the employee may wish to file a new form W-4 with their employer so taxes withheld will be more ...


1

If you are resident in Germany, then Germany expects you to pay tax on your entire worldwide income. It does not matter where the work was performed, or where you are paid to/from You should not have to pay tax on this due to the double taxation agreement between Germany and the USA, but you will need to study this in detail to determine in detail how to ...


1

Check this site: https://www.steuerklassen.com/steuererklaerung/ratgeber/steuererklaerung-korrigieren/ Basically, within one month after you receive the reply to your income tax declaration you can easily fix mistakes. After that it’s difficult. You can ask the Finanzamt to please fix your mistake, and if they do, you are fine. If they don’t you’d have ...


1

As as EU citizen you are granted the right to live and work inside the EU wherever you see fit. So yes, this is legally possible. However, you need the right paperwork. For taxes, you need to consult a tax accountant locally. For your working contract you need to make sure it's all in order, i.e. the address is correct. As for insurances you need to figure ...


1

Short answer: Yes, yes and no. Penalties are unknown. You are strongly advised to use a tax advisor (Steuerberater), since you don't seem to know how these things work. Long answer: Summery from Blog listed below (in German). Do I have to inform the Finanzamt immediately? Yes and this can be done online by filling the needed form A 2011 English ...


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Tax Forms can be found here Formular-Management-System der Bundesfinanzverwaltung select Steuerformulare A list of different types will be shown select Einkommensteuer (Income tax) A list of the different years will be shown 2019 is not yet being offered After selecting a year (2018), all available forms will be listed 001 - Anleitungen zur ...


1

Yes, you can invest in the stock market with an F-1 status. However, there are a few things to keep in mind: 1) It can't be active trading. It's up to interpretation what exactly that means. In my opinion if you are not constantly trading and trying to make trading a big part of your income, you should be fine. A good example is a 401(k), you're investing ...


1

Yes, the need for a compulsory malpractice insurance is defined in § 25 (2) StBerG, that is quoted below. Steuerberatungsgesetz (StBerG) § 25 Haftungsausschluß, Haftpflichtversicherung (1) Bei der Hilfeleistung in Steuersachen im Rahmen der Befugnis nach § 4 Nr. 11 für die Mitglieder kann die Haftung des Vereins für das Verschulden seiner Organe und ...


1

You can have multiple jobs there is no law against it. One or more of them could be working self-employed ("Selbstständiger"/"Freiberufler") or for your own company. Not every profession can be "Selbstständiger", it must be some kind of creative, mental work. Programming would work. Scrubbing toilets would not. But you can have your own company for any sort ...


1

Your income tax and old-age pension will be paid in Germany and will be deducted from your pay automaticly. When leaving Germany you should apply for a Versicherungsverlauf, which will assist you when applying for a Pension in the future see details inside in the first link below, togeather with other tips one what must be done after arrival in Germany ...


1

You have said you are "moving" from Italy to Germany. That makes things much simpler. (Rules are more complex if you live in one country and work in another.) Your salary will be taxed in Germany. You will not be liable for tax on your salary in Italy, provided you register with AIRE. You should pay contributions for old-age pensions in Germany. Your ...


1

If your spouse is tax resident in the UK then they will be liable to pay UK tax on their foreign income. If he is living for more than half the year in the UK, he will almost certainly be tax resident in the UK. Most people in the UK do not complete a tax return, because their tax is automatically deducted by their employer (pay as you earn). However, ...


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First of all, if you are an employee AND you do not have any stocks/other incomes it is not mandatory for you to do a taxes declaration. However, it is reccommended to do it, especially the 1st year since you will get quite some money back to cover the expenses of your moving. If you decide to do the declaration, check carefully the deadline for the ...


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US federal income tax Yes, as a US citizen, you have to file a US federal income tax return every year, regardless of residence, unless your gross income is below the filing threshold (page 10, Chart A) (for 2018: US$12,000 for a single person under 65). You must report all worldwide income. However, there are some ways your US federal tax on foreign ...


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As a US green card holder, you may not stay for more than 1 year without requesting a re-entry permit. https://help.cbp.gov/app/answers/detail/a_id/820/~/can-a-u.s.-lawful-permanent-resident-leave-multiple-times-and-return Regarding taxes, as a green card holder, you will also be subject to US taxes even if living in Germany. But, if continuing to work ...


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