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Your residency permit includes a work permit. You can take on any type of work you want, in this regard you are no different from a German citizen. That includes working for foreign companies, which is a lot easier for you because you also are allowed to work in the US due to your citizenship. If you happen to find a US company that has a branch located in ...


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The potential issue is that your J-1 status only gives you authorization to perform work in the US within your J-1 program. This issue depends on whether you are physically located in the US while performing the work, regardless of the employer's location, payment method and payment location. One option which might work for you is "Occasional Lectures ...


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In the situation you describe, IMHO, it would be overly complex to setup business in Germany and apply for any visa / permits for that if you will be working for a UK company. Did you consider setting up business in the UK for that? Creating a UK limited company can be done online, is easy and also legal as long as you handle taxation properly. Please note ...


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This cases are always quite complicated and you better discuss it with a lawyer before making the decision. Looking at this document from OECD it one may think that it would be without tax consequences up to 30 days: https://www.oecd.org/tax/automatic-exchange/crs-implementation-and-assistance/tax-residency/Switzerland-Residency.pdf There may be other ...


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There is a tax treaty between the United States and Japan. However the whole point of the Foreign Earned Income Exclusion tax is to avoid double taxation for US expats. So I'm assuming you are referring to income over that limit. From the Technical Explanation of the tax treaty, Article 4: A resident of one State may be taxed by the other State only on ...


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