17

No, if you never watch any kind of Live TV, nor the BBC iPlayer, you don't need to pay the TV Licence fee. This means that you will not be able to watch any kind of Live TV, even if it's not the BBC (like ITV, Channel4, Sky, etc. - also this includes online live streaming as well). You also cannot watch the BBC iPlayer (neither the live nor the on-demand ...


12

With the advent of Digital HD TV the difference between NTSC and PAL is practically limited to the framerate of the display which is 23,975p/30p/60i on NTSC and 25p/50i on PAL standards. Modern, digital television sets will have no issues with any of them. The voltage frequency is also not an issue, as the digital decoder is running on DC, so the frequency ...


7

Most modern televisions have a range of voltages that they support. If you're picking up a new one, you just need to ensure that the voltage range includes that 120V that you get in the US. As most television is transmitted digitally these days, the concern over signal is not important unless you're hoping to get analog signals. The only difference you'd ...


7

@SztupY did a good job except for the last question, which I will address: How do DVD and Blue-ray fit into this? DVDs (and possibly Blu-Rays) are still encoded using either NTSC or PAL, but any modern DVD player (and likely any old one) will convert to your TV's expected input. So even if you're playing a British DVD on a US player, you will have no ...


6

This may be a matter of opinion, but I'll give you my advice from personal experience. Buy everything there in Denmark. If your move is relatively temporary, as in just a couple of years, you can store that stuff. If your move is permanent, sell it. It is vastly less hassle and long-term cost to just get most of your standard electronics locally.


5

Although an answer has already been selected, I don't feel either of the answers is fully satisfactory. Quite simply, you only need a TV license if you are actually watching or recording live TV from any broadcast television station, either via terrestrial broadcast, cable, satellite, or over the internet. That means you don't need a license to watch Youtube/...


5

The tuner won't receive over-the-air broadcasts in the US. The digital TV standard in use is different. You will have to use some kind of set-top-box for it to work. Also, all the menus and smart features will be in Japanese only. English support is very rare on domestic models. This could be an issue if you want to use things like Netflix, which are ...


4

Some electronic appliances can work with both 110V 60hz and 220V 50hz (e.g. most laptop & phones power supplies, televisions, etc.) Check your TV specs: it may already be compatible with 220-240V 50hz that you find in Europe: you may just need a socket adapter.


3

My colleague brought his TV from Canada to Denmark, and brought a transformer from Canada. The TV caught fire after about a week, we assume because the transformer wasn't adequate -- check the cost of a suitable transformer! If you intend to watch broadcast TV (rather than just DVDs/laptop etc) also check if the TV is compatible with European standards. ...


3

The answer will be different for different kinds of content. YouTube has a ton of good stuff. It can be a good place to start, especially for old TV series. TV channels' own websites or apps have some content available, usually in the catch-up window (or "replay" as it's called in France) i.e. for a limited time following original broadcast. If there's a ...


3

Dunno how I didn't spot this before but guess I was too focused around the setup they were already using and had tailored my searches around that but the below links seem to solve the problem mostly albeit losing some channels but being official. http://www.sky4me.tv/sky-uk-italy http://www.skyeurope.tv/sky-subscription-italy Both sites provide access to SKY ...


3

I have British friends in Japan who have used TV-through-the-net (like Slingbox) to transmit the programming over the internet for viewing through an internet connection anywhere they travel to. This requires: Having someone in the UK to set up the box for you and connect it to the internet Fast enough internet connections on both sides Some technical ...


2

Most US televisions (including HDTVs) do not support 50Hz video. Name brand manufactures disable this capability. I suspect its because the US consumer market is very price competitive and they don't want cheap US market TV sets driving down prices and their profits in other markets.


2

Hi everyone we live in comano northern Italy. We have a 1.2 metre dish and a invacom quad lnb. We only use 1 feed for sky tv. We get bbc channels from approx 0700 to 1700 hrs. This also depends on weather. The more cloud rain etc we lose signal. Sky news remains on in bad weather. We use a panasonic dsb 31 box. I am a ex satelite installer from ...


2

I rely on Film On to see most of my European channels. SD watching is free, you pay for HD quality. The site is http://www.filmon.com for browser streaming, and they have got a pretty good and free app for multiple platforms, from iOS, Android, LG TV, OS/X, Windows, Roku, xbox, Apple TV. Pretty amazing. app They are pretty organised, and have groups of ...


2

For your specific purpose it might simply be much easier to buy a converter, especially since they aren't too expensive. For example see this one: https://www.retrogamingcables.co.uk/european-scart-to-japanese-scart-converter


1

If you have a decent Internet connection its easy - Use Sky or UKTV4ITALIA If you want a real or normal TV experience watching through your TV, UKTV4ITALIA do a box that you plug into your hdmi port on your TV and also the internet and you can get all the UK free to air channels and lots more, including all the UK radio channels, 14 day catch up and ...


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