5

The way EU law is structured, EU citizens cannot really “overstay” and technicalities like that should not have an incidence on your right to reside in another EU country. Think of it as being late on some paperwork rather than overstaying, that would be closer to the truth. If registering is mandatory (as it is in Denmark) and the host state wants to apply ...


4

The UK Ancestry Visa page ( https://www.gov.uk/ancestry-visa ) says I need an offer That is not correct. It says that you need "evidence that you’re planning to work in the UK." It then goes on to give examples of such evidence, one of which is "job offers you’ve received." You can submit other evidence instead, but I do not know how ...


3

The Answer posted by @phoog is correct, and is explained in more detail by the UK Ancestry Guidance cited in Traveller's comment. Page 17 of 37 of the Guidance says: The applicant does not have to be working at the time they apply. They need only demonstrate they are able to work and intend to take and seek employment. Evidence of this could include, but is ...


3

Yes, that's correct. It is the case in the UK and a few EU countries. In particular, the UK family visa has English-language knowledge and income requirements and significant fees (£1,000-£1,500 per person), which are all illegal under EU freedom of movement rules. All this is the basis for the Surinder Singh route but it is presently unclear how much will ...


3

It's looking like there will be a transition period until at least the end of 2020. The current UK government wants to eliminate the possibility of extending this period, but some in the EU have said that it may be unavoidable. The likelihood of going one way or the other will become more apparent later in the year. During the transition period, free ...


2

The most likely reason is that you’re using the wrong application form and/or you have filled in some information incorrectly. The question ‘which passport did you use to enter the UK’ implies you are in the UK, whereas you state in your question that you’ve never entered the UK. If you’re sure that you’ve selected the right form to apply from outside ...


1

The law has not changed. It is essentially impossible for a UK resident, citizen or otherwise, to bring over a relative other than a minor (under 18) child or spouse. The lawyer you spoke to advised you correctly. If your sister is not already a graduate, the best option for your sister to come to the UK is to study at a UK university. She would need to pay ...


1

You don't need to do anything special to return. As far as which visa is preferable for your husband, it probably makes little practical difference once the visa is granted. In both cases, if you intend to stay in the UK long term, your husband will need to extend his visa once, and then apply for indefinite leave to remain after having lived in the UK for 5 ...


1

We've just went through a name-change (before acquiring British citizenship) with the help of the Hungarian Consulate in Edinburgh. (It's a much smaller establishment than the London one so you might get a better more personalized support) You need a deed poll, and a couple documents showing your new name. We have provided a driving licence, a debit card ...


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