11

Based on the information you provided the Government's citizenship checking site is actually quite helpful (it's sometimes not so helpful if you were born before 1983, but in your case it's actually okay): When were you born? On or after 1 January 1983 As you were born in 1992 Were you born in the UK or a qualifying territory? No No, the USA is not ...


8

Your question is really about British citizenship because someone can only get a British passport if they are already a British citizen or other British national. You didn't give enough details to determine whether she is currently a British citizen. I can give some situations in which she would be a British citizen from birth. If she was born in the UK, ...


7

It's the same as getting normal citizenship. From the UK Government site on citizenship: You can apply for British citizenship by naturalisation if: you’re 18 or over you’re of good character, eg you don’t have a serious or recent criminal record you’ll continue to live in the UK you have met the knowledge of English and life in the UK ...


6

There isn't really a conflict here although that may not be obvioius. Citizenship is not a visa and is handled by a different government department. Hence their considerations are decididly neutral. The basic requirements for presence in the UK during the qualifying period(s) apply to everybody equally regardless of how they may have gotten to the stage ...


6

I am not a lawyer, but apparently if you are over 65 you do not have to pass the language test and the Life in the UK test, see the links below: https://www.gov.uk/english-language https://www.gov.uk/life-in-the-uk-test and also https://www.gov.uk/browse/citizenship/citizenship


6

Do I qualify for a UK passport\citizenship? See Apply for citizenship if you have a British parent/You were born before 1983. Since you did not mention your father, I presume he was not British. This would mean that you are not automatically a British citizen, but you can apply: If you’re not automatically a citizen You may be eligible to apply for ...


5

As Greg Hewgill notes, you do not need a visa to enter the UK because you are a US citizen. For people who do normally require a visa, the Spanish residence permit will exempt them from that requirement. In fact, that permit, which should be endorsed "family member of a citizen of the European Union" (or the equivalent in Spanish) is evidence of their ...


5

While there could be edge cases, you daughter is a UK citizen by descent. You can check here: https://www.gov.uk/check-british-citizen. The edge cases would include your daughter not being your biological daughter (e.g., if you are transgender or a lesbian) or you being a UK citizen by descent (e.g., if you father was a diplomat working for a non-UK country)...


4

If at the time of the child's birth, the father was a "British citizen" (there are other kinds of British nationals; but if he is from the UK then he is almost certainly a British citizen) "otherwise than by descent" (i.e. citizen by birth in the UK, or citizen by naturalization or registration), then the children would be automatically (and involuntarily) ...


4

Based solely upon the information you have given, the children may have a claim to being "British by Descent". They would acquire all the trappings of full British citizenship but do not have the ability to pass their citizenship on to their children. This answer assumes that the father is British otherwise than by descent (i.e., born in the UK to ...


4

It's under Work -> Non Points Based Working Visas -> UK Ancestry


4

If you are born abroad in 1983 then you are a British citizen (by descent) if your mother was a British citizen by birth. your father was a British citizen by birth, and he was married to your mother when you were born British citizen by birth means that they were born in the UK and Colonies. Unfortunately, Rhodesia (North or South) was not considered as ...


4

This is one of the cases where the government's citizenship checker is not really helpful, but let's try to answer the questions newertheless: When were you born? Before 1 January 1983 As you were born before 1983 Were you born in the UK or a qualifying territory? No No, the US is not one of the qualifying territories Were you a UK and Colonies ...


4

Based on the government's site: And you must usually have: (...) been granted indefinite leave to stay in the UK (or permanent residence if you’re an EEA national) - this means there’s no specific date that you have to leave had indefinite leave to stay in the UK for the last 12 months (or permanent residence if you’re an EEA national) ...


4

You are British, but do not know if you can transmit your nationality to your daughter because you may (or may not) be 'British by Descent', it's the type of British that cannot transmit their nationality. The only people allowed to transmit British nationality are 'British Otherwise than by Descent' (i.e., born in the UK to settled parents, etc etc). The ...


4

You are not currently a British citizen, because British citizenship by descent could only be passed from the father prior to 1983. However, you are currently eligible to register as a British citizen, if you would have gotten citizenship had women been able transmit citizenship the same way men could. Basically, this means your mother had to have been a ...


3

Under the Immigration Rules, in order to qualify for any family settlement visa (spouse, fiance, family dependent etc.), you must meet the financial requirements – by earning above the Income Threshold. You can do this by earning a minimum of £18,600 annually, or by having a minimum of £62,500 in cash savings (and you are allowed to combine your income with ...


3

As your father was born outside the UK, once he gets his citizenship he will be a UK citizen by descent. UK citizens by descent generally cannot pass on citizenship to their children who are born outside the UK. There is at least one exception however, in that if the UK citizen by descent lived in the UK for at least a 3 year period, they then can pass on ...


3

Even if you had entered using your passport, you would have no passport stamps, because EU countries do not stamp the passports of EU citizens. The problem of having no passport stamps is therefore one that applies to every EU, EEA, or Swiss citizen who wants to prove presence in the UK. You will first need to apply to have the UK recognize your status as a ...


3

Yes, your situation sounds the same as mine, as long as your mother was a British citizen "otherwise than by descent". My mother was born and raised in Scotland by British parents My father is a US-only citizen I was born in the US in 1971 The starter page for information can be found here - you're looking for form UKM. I did all this back in 2011, so ...


3

You should be able to ignore the eligibility section and simply submit the application form -- you are automatically eligible as a EEA citizen.. If you have been working or otherwise certified during those five years, the following statement (in section 3) should apply to you: I’ve lived in the UK for a continuous period of five years as an EEA national ...


2

You don't lose British citizenship upon naturalization in a foreign country after 1948. Since you naturalized in Canada after 1948, you did not lose British citizenship, and still have it.


2

Your child can get British citizenship in the following ways: Register under section 3(2): To qualify for this, you need to have a parent (the child's grandparent) who was a British citizen otherwise than by descent, and you need to have lived in the UK for a period of 3 years some time in your life before the child's birth, during which you were not absent ...


2

MLC will have been writing to you to tell you your options. You can have access to Australian Super from age 55. If deemed a 'trivial amount' (I do not know threshold for this) it can be paid as lump sum, but you will have to see how HMRC treat the receipt of this - probably as income taxed at highest marginal rate. If over threshold, can be paid as ...


2

As an American citizen, you do not need a visa to visit the UK for up to six months. This is independent of where you actually live or who you are married to. Acquiring British citizenship is not automatic, and according to British nationality law as a married partner of a British citizen you must have lived in the UK for at least three years (among other ...


2

Shortly after the Brexit Referendum, the Open Society Justice Initiative circulated a practice note to various people in the UK legal community. Its contents are embargoed, but generally it advises solicitors with EU, EEA, or Swiss clients to... Get an EU/EEA permanent residence card for the UK if doing so presents no harm to them; and Prepare quality ...


2

Sort of. Look at Section 5 of the AN guidance for the various ways you can meet the residency qualification requirements. I think the 7 years route might be your best bet. Keep in mind though that they are quite strict about the previous 12 months. Anything over 100 days absent puts your application in more of a discretionary position and you will have to ...


2

According to the UK government site, the five-year period is that immediately preceding your application: And you must usually have: lived in the UK for at least the 5 years before the date of your application https://www.gov.uk/becoming-a-british-citizen/check-if-you-can-apply As you note, you also must usually have spent no more than 450 days outside ...


2

No. There are considerable limits to just how far back the acquistion of UK citizenship by ancestry will reach. Edit: Your father qualifies to acquire UK citizenship through several possible scenarios because he had a grandparent who was born in the UK. However, unless you've described your lineage incorrectly, you do not have a grandfather who was born in ...


2

When my wife was practicing for her Life in the UK test a few years ago she found TheUKTest website useful in addition to the official book referenced in the question.


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