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12

Arrival You will probably have a reasonably easy entry into the country, since you have a visa. You will need your passport, visa, and any supporting documents (eg: copies of contracts with your employer). Make sure you have things like your employer's phone number written on paper, not on your phone/laptop. You don't want to have to try charge your phone ...


9

Maybe they're hoping they can keep you out until after the UK leaves the EU. The decision is, as you have laid out, completely illegal and noncompliant with the UK's own guidance. To answer your questions: Should I include the refusal letter of the first application indicating the mistake (if indeed it is a mistake) that the fact that we have two ...


9

The big problem that I see with this arrangement is that the UK considers it work -- and it is; you will literally be working for compensation -- and will not allow you to enter for that purpose without a work visa.


7

Whether you or your daughter or your husband can settle in the UK is a complicated question. The answer(s) depend(s) on the interaction of each of your individual citizenships, and the UK's visa policy. UK Citizenship (called "British Citizenship" in UK governmental documents) is itself a complex issue, as British citizenship depends on the interaction of ...


6

Results from a 2013 consultation on fees may interest you: https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/fees-and-charging-immigration-and-visas-consultation The money does go to maintain the immigration system generally, but it is not linked directly to the actual cost of processing your visa. They have an income target to meet, so fees are balanced to take ...


5

No. It's your commute, and there may very well be case workers who have longer ones than that to get to their job. If they ask, you can explain it, but that is a readily defensible situation. The scenarios that normally raise eyebrows are ones where the immigrant has never lived close to their work and lives hundreds of miles away. And even that is drawing ...


5

For people who finds themselves in the same situation, here's what happened. I was able to send my application to Home Office to "retain rights of residence'' from within the UK and was granted for 5 years BRC .


5

Please note that what the immigration officers are looking for is proof of a marriage that is based on equal partnership and is genuine. While there is no definite list of documents to illustrate a genuine marriage, chats and photos have only a limited value at developing a picture of a relationship-- and can easily be manipulated. There are a few things ...


5

Yes, you need to submit a photo of your baby—this is the case for all UK passport and visa applications, regardless of the age of the child. You can read the guidance for photos here. The requirements are the same as for adults but with these concessions: Children aged five and under do not need to have a neutral expression or to look directly at the ...


4

on www.gov.uk/ Visas when you separate or divorce 1. Tell the Home Office You must tell the Home Office when you divorce or separate from your partner if your visa is based on your relationship. You must then either apply for a new visa or leave the UK. Your visa is based on your relationship if you have permission to stay in the ...


4

Citizens Advice outlines the different methods and notes that, when you're unsure of the dates, you have the option of sending the request on paper via the post (emphasis mine). You can get a copy of a birth certificate by post from the General Register Office. You should provide as much information about the birth as possible. If you do not know ...


4

This looks a little fishy. According to EUN02: When a marriage / civil partnership of convenience is suspected, the burden of proof is high and rests with the ECO. They have use the refusal formula that corresponds with inadequate evidence to support your claim of relationship, but you have submitted the marriage certificate, which should by itself be ...


4

In the UK, it is not a crime to quit your job. If you do not honor your contract (i.e., notice period), you can be responsible for "damages". Your employment rights are governed by UK and EU labor laws and are not affected by the fact that your are an expat. At the point at which you quit your job, the UKBA will potentially curtail your leave to remain. If ...


4

Your partner can apply for an EEA family permit. It's not necessary, however, because your partner, being a Brazilian citizen, is eligible to enter the UK without a visa. The advantage of the EEA family permit is that it allows you to get an official evaluation of all your documents before you travel to the UK -- without one, you would present these ...


4

You have been refused for a fiance visa, we don't know why. You now want to apply for a Tier 2 Inter-company Transfer (T2 ICT). And your question is... What should I do? A T2 ICT is laid out such that you are actually a minor player. The host company does all of the heavy lifting by getting their license and then by issuing a Certificate of Sponsorship (...


4

Yes, fewer than 250 employees is the official mark for a SME (Small or Medium Enterprise), and there are often policies aimed at assisting this end of the market. Points b and c on that document are also aimed at stopping larger businesses getting around this by creating smaller offshoot companies. A job does not have to be on the Shortage Occupation List ...


4

You initially posted in Travel wanting to know the options available to you. You were referred to Expats (here) because among the options available to you are the EEA/EU and UK family formation/family reunion routes. The EEA/EU route is available because your boyfriend is an EEA national and hence enjoys freedom of movement. For this option to work you ...


4

Yes I called tlscontact Tunisia they confirmed that I can pay just the visa fee in cash but IHS should be paid online


4

Your son doesn't need a visa, of course. His wife can use an EEA family permit if they'll be moving before Brexit. Otherwise, she'll probably need a regular family visa, which she can use anyway, but this route is thousands of pounds more costly. The ability for family members of UK citizens to use the EEA regulations to enter the UK depends on the ...


4

Although your little one was born in the UK, she may not be considered a returning resident, was about 2 months old when she left and has been in Pakistan for the last 8 months. Pakistan is among those countries whose visa applicants require TB testing. While you have the correct UK link, Tuberculosis tests for visa applicants, the section following what ...


3

From the description you've given, I'm assuming that she is in a degree level course. The problem is that if her visa has been granted for less than 12 months, any dependents would not be able to work. If you are a dependent of a spouse holding a student visa granted for 12 months or more at a university degree level course, then yes, you may work remotely. ...


3

A biometric residence permit is an identification card that also shows your status as a resident of the United Kingdom. It's called biometric because it includes some information about your physical characteristics, namely your fingerprints and your digitally encoded photograph, encoded on an RFID chip. This is similar to a biometric passport, and indeed ...


3

The correct uk.gov page for your case is Apply for a UK residence card, where, under Eligibility, it notes the circumstances entitling one to a retained right of residence. Retained rights of residence You can also apply if you used to have a family member, or extended family member, who was a permanent resident or qualified person. This is called a ‘...


3

The 2nd FLR leg runs from the decision date, so you keep the current visa active until 28 days before it expires. You will 'waste time' anyway because the decisions are not instantaneous. It can take up to 4 - 5 months unless you use the premium service. The FLR(M) Guidance advises applying 28 days before the expiry date of her current visa. The extension ...


3

Germany and the UK are separate countries with separate immigration systems (despite the fact that they are both EU countries). If Germany approves your blue card application then you simply will not use that visa. The UK won't care about it.


3

Step 1: Stop making applications. You risk attracting serious refusals that will not look good in your application history. At least for short-term visa this may lead to a worst case of a ban. Step 2: Get a solicitor. While we do not know all of your application history nor the full text of the refusal, there is enough evidence that neither you, nor the ...


3

Under the Immigration Rules, in order to qualify for any family settlement visa (spouse, fiance, family dependent etc.), you must meet the financial requirements – by earning above the Income Threshold. You can do this by earning a minimum of £18,600 annually, or by having a minimum of £62,500 in cash savings (and you are allowed to combine your income with ...


3

Sorry but there is no suitable visa that matches what you have asked for. The visa that might suit you is for study. Once you have completed your studies you may then be able to apply for a new visa for work. The total cost will be tens of thousands of British pounds (over at least 5 years) because you will have to pay international student fees for your ...


3

6 months seems a long time for a business visit. As a general rule the business visitor should conduct the actual work in their home country and only visit the UK for meetings. From the UK government webpage Business – general activities 5 A visitor may: (a) attend meetings, conferences, seminars, interviews; (b) give a one-off or short series of ...


3

I think you want: Reason for visit: settlement Visa type: settlement Visa subtype: wife or husband, as appropriate


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