4

Your intentions for entering the UK should (by law) always match your visa type. So you will need to apply for visitor's visa.


3

6 months seems a long time for a business visit. As a general rule the business visitor should conduct the actual work in their home country and only visit the UK for meetings. From the UK government webpage Business – general activities 5 A visitor may: (a) attend meetings, conferences, seminars, interviews; (b) give a one-off or short series of ...


2

Being paid while you are visiting on a tourist visa is fine. For a simpler example, consider a full-time US employee that visits the UK for a week. There is absolutely no problem about their employer depositing their salary in their bank account during the visit.


2

The most likely reason is that you’re using the wrong application form and/or you have filled in some information incorrectly. The question ‘which passport did you use to enter the UK’ implies you are in the UK, whereas you state in your question that you’ve never entered the UK. If you’re sure that you’ve selected the right form to apply from outside ...


2

hope it shows. I m not able to upload previously.


2

No clean slate. Sorry. There is a general guidance that for some visa types, certain transgressions older than ten years may be disregarded at the case worker's discretion. That doesn't seem to apply to your case, and you will have to give some extra explanations as to why the UK can trust that you won't violate the terms of the Tier 4 visa. The fact that ...


2

There is no mechanism to change your immigration status from Tier 5 to visitor from within the UK. You will need to exit and re-enter as a visitor. As a Canadian you are eligible to stay for up to 6 months visa-free, however if you return soon after your Tier 5 visa ends you should be prepared to prove that you fulfil the Immigration Rules relating to ...


1

No, absolutely not. It is never possible (outside of a few narrow cases such as asylum seekers, and other exceptional situations) to switch from being a visitor to the UK to any other status. All applications for residence must be made from outside the UK.


1

I believe that you may have been confused about the names and conditions of the visas available. The visa referred to in both of the questions you have linked is the Marriage Visitor Visa. This visa is for people who wish to come to the UK to get married and then leave (hence the use of the word "visitor"). This visa is not suitable for people who intend to ...


1

Since your children would not be getting married, they can enter as visitors, as they have been doing. Because they are not required to have visas to enter as visitors, you do not need to apply for visas for them.


1

You can apply for a fiancé visa, but there is a requirement that you must have met already. The easiest way to do that is for her to visit you; if you apply for a visit visa to meet her it's more costly and has a higher risk of refusal (she may not even need a visa to visit you). There are other requirements for her to be your visa sponsor for marriage such ...


1

Yes, they can apply for another UK visa and would want to include an explanation of the change in plans. UK policy allows only one type of permission at a time, so the issuing post would curtail the current (and unused) visa at the time it issues another visa to your family members.


1

If your family is able to meet the visa requirements without your support (even if you’re providing it), a simple statement of your address in the UK, proof that where you live has adequate space for them as defined by the Housing Act, a copy of your lease agreement, and that you have permission to have visitors (from the landlord or the council). Should ...


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