7

It is the Regulation (EC) No 883/2004 that is relevant here. In principle the workland principle applies. These means that social security from the country where you work is relevant. When you are unemployed it is the social security of the homeland that applies. As @gael already mentioned there is an allowed period where you can live abroad to seek work: ...


5

If you can prove you are a US citizen, you can certainly return to the US. As for unemployment benefits, it will depend on the state, but generally states only provide unemployment benefits based on your recent employment in that state. For example, from Maryland's unemployment FAQ: An unemployment insurance claim is filed against the state where you ...


4

Generally speaking, you are getting your unemployment benefits from your country of residence. To be eligible, however, you must usually stay in that country (they send you job offers, check on you etc.). This is not transferable to another EU country, i.e., you can't just move to a different country and start getting the support there. Nevertheless, as Gaël ...


4

Yes, and no, depending on the state where you're still technically employed. If you pay into the fund then you are entitled to benefit from it should you need it, but (depending on the state) They probably won't send your benefits abroad, someone in the US will need to receive, endorse and deposit the checks (unless your state allows for direct deposit of ...


2

Germany §60 SGB II Mitwirkungs- und Mitteilungspflicht Requirment to cooperate and to report in Based on this social law and your specific conditions, you are required to report in to your case manager, when requested, to report about your progress and efforts or anything else required in a letter that may have been sent. Often the next date is set ...


2

I don't know if she is entitled, but the process to claim unemployment benefit is to turn up at the local Agentur für Arbeit and register. It is helpful to speak some German, but my experience is that they will speak slowly if you ask them to. It is an altogether more civilized experience than I remember from the UK in the 80's (and it has only got worse ...


2

The question is a bit broad but here a few salient points from the website: You must be ready to take up employment for at least 20 hours per week (there are in particular limits if you have kids and no way to care for them should you find work, in that case you might not be able to get both Kinderbetreuungsgeld and unemployment benefits), possibly need to ...


1

It is called Unemployment insurance and requires 12 monthly payments as a minimum.


1

This is not quite an answer to your immediate question but thinking about this some more, I reckon that registering as unemployed might actually benefit you. Obviously, I don't know what the rules are going to be and I cannot predict what will happen when the UK effectively leaves the EU but it seems reasonable to assume that people with “permanent residence”...


1

Well ... if you fulfill the normal requirements, independent of your nationality etc., why not? There is probably no law paragraph for your specific situation, so I can't quote it ... but basically, if you legally worked and paid the insurance, you should be able to get something out of it too. The most important conditions are 360 or more days ...


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