8

Don’t get fooled by statistics. If you compare the gun violence numbers to the total population, it is still very small, and you will proably never encounter it - I live in the US for 15 years, and I have not seen a single gun yet (outside a shop). Your chance to have a serious car accident while driving is significantly higher. Of course, there are places ...


7

When should I mention my situation (non-US citizen, no working visa), should it be during phone interview, or should I keep it about my skills, see if they thing I am a good fit and let them decide later if I'm worth the trouble of obtaining the visa? I think you should tell them immediately. Getting a visa can be a difficult process, particularly if the ...


7

A key question is whether your assault was "simple" or "aggravated"; the former is not considered to be a "crime involving moral turpitude," so it does not make you inadmissible. Even if it were aggravated assault, a single conviction for a "crime of moral turpitude" does not by itself make you inadmissible if the maximum penalty you could have received was ...


6

The Social Security Administration FAQs indicate that benefits claims are initiated from within the US. Can noncitizens living outside the United States receive Social Security benefits? In most cases, we stop payments to noncitizens after they are outside the United States for six calendar months in a row. If we stop your payments, we will not start ...


6

The answer to your general question in the topic line is: It depends on the country of citizenship. Some don't care and allow dual (multiple) citizenship, some have automatic loss of their citizenship upon acquisition of any other citizenship by any means, and some others have complicated response depending on whether the other citizenship was acquired via ...


6

In the US divorce is a matter for state law, but generally it is possible to divorce in the US if your spouse lives at a US address at the time the divorce is filed. It is often possible to divorce in the US even if your spouse has moved overseas, though some states may restrict this to uncontested divorces. If your marriage certificate is not in English you ...


6

Leaving the company does not, in itself, affect the petition -- people can be petitioned while not in the US and not working for the petitioner, as long as the petitioner intends to employ the immigrant after they immigrate. However, most companies will withdraw the I-140 after you leave the company. If the I-140 is withdrawn before your I-485 has been ...


5

I wouldn't worry about it. A substantial majority of those gun murders are criminals killing other criminals and most of the rest are domestic matters--neither of these poses any appreciable threat to those who don't put themselves in the situation in the first place. Even most of those "mass shootings" are criminals killing criminals--a lot of people ...


5

CRBA is only for children who were already US citizens from birth. Your daughter was not a US citizen at birth, because you did not meet the conditions to pass US citizenship onto her. Therefore, CRBA is not applicable. Since your whole family is planning to immigrate to the US, the proper thing to do would be to petition (with I-130) your husband and your ...


5

When you immigrate, any under-21 unmarried child you have at that time will be able to immigrate as a derivative beneficiary. Note that you must list your spouse and all your children when you applied for the Diversity Visa lottery, regardless of whether they will immigrate with you or not. From the 2016 instructions (pdf): all living natural children; ...


5

You may be misunderstanding what the financial requirements are all about. The Canadians do not only want to see if you have enough money in your hands to pay for a year of tuition and living experiences. They want to know where the money came from, and if it is really yours. If it was a loan, they will wonder how you plan to repay it. They want to know if ...


5

Prior to October 2019, there was no ground to deny someone a visa or deny someone entry based on having used Medicaid. There is a ground inadmissibility if someone is "likely to become a public charge", but the determination of that did not consider non-cash benefits like Medicaid (except Medicaid for long-term institutionalized care). See this USCIS page as ...


5

If you can prove you are a US citizen, you can certainly return to the US. As for unemployment benefits, it will depend on the state, but generally states only provide unemployment benefits based on your recent employment in that state. For example, from Maryland's unemployment FAQ: An unemployment insurance claim is filed against the state where you ...


5

Because you accrued more than 1 year of "unlawful presence" after your I-94 expired and before you left, you triggered a 10-year INA 212(a)(9)(B)(i)(II) ban. Being removed from inside the US for the first time also triggered a 10-year INA 212(a)(9)(A)(ii)(I) ban. (Hopefully you did not claim to be a US citizen when you worked in the US, because that would ...


5

A little sleuthing at the wayback machine shows that California was not actually certified compliant with Real ID until May 25th of this year. Before that, they were for a brief while "under review," before which they were operating under an extension. Their failure to print "limited term" on limited term licenses, as required by 6 CFR 37.21(e) may have ...


4

No. There are no oaths required of any kind. You just have to qualify for the status and be patient with Indian bureaucracy. It can take a while. On a side note: Make sure you get all of your details correct and have somebody proofread your application. It's a real pain to get anything updated once you've got OCI.


4

Your daughter is probably already a British citizen. If this is the case, then she can Apply online for a UK passport. Otherwise, she can try to register as a UK citizen and then apply for a passport.


4

This expands the existing answer to give a bit more explanation of why the employer should know about the need for a visa as soon as possible. Even if they sponsor visa applications, and not all organizations do, the job may not be suitable, you may not be qualified, or the timing may not meet their needs. See, for example, H-1B Specialty Occupations, DOD ...


4

I think the main question is whether you want to keep your US permanent residency and avenue to citizenship or not. If you stay a PR but go to Singapore for employment and don’t file Federal taxes (or worse, file non-resident taxation status), you’ll be considered to have abandoned your permanent residency. You need to be careful when engaged in long-term ...


4

It is an Australian passport, so the answer is "Australia."


4

All you need to do is get your child her British passport. Then you should be able to travel with her back to the United Kingdom, no problem. I've heard people say that you might need a letter from the other parent stating that she consents to you traveling alone with the child. I have done this trip both ways traveling alone with a daughter and had no ...


4

There's no explicit question here that is on topic for this site, but there is an implicit question about immigration status, perhaps for each of your parents. I presume that your father is a lawful permanent resident (LPR) in the US, that is, that he has a green card. If that is the case then he has nothing to worry about as far as his immigration status ...


4

Based on the German Embassy information quoted further down, the chances are high that have not lost your German citizenship. To determine this property, you must apply for a Staatsangehörigkeitsausweis, for which the details can be found here: Feststellung der deutschen Staatsangehörigkeit (Staatsangehörigkeitsausweis) Before you apply, please read ...


3

I am not an expert but H-1B may not be applicable as its a specialty work, where the employer has to prove that they could not find the person with the specialty skill in USA and hence requesting H-1B for their "new" employee. The "New" employee offer would be contingent upon getting the H-1B visa. But, H-1B visa can not be obtained like any other visa.. ...


3

In California you can apply for a driver's license without a SSN if you can prove legal presence (e.g. an F visa) but are ineligible for a SSN. Once you become eligible for a SSN you must obtain one and provide it to the DMV when you renew your license (which you will do frequently since California licenses for non-immigrants expire when their current legal ...


3

This page on the europa.eu website indicates that if you live in Germany for less than six months, you are not considered tax resident. However, you do need to pay taxes on any income earned in Germany during that year. That fits with how taxes in the US and Canada work. The new resident pays taxes for what they earned while in the country that year. ...


3

And, hey, I was wrong! I don't believe this happens every year, so you should not rely on it, but for last year's diversity visa, DV-2017, the US government has announced: Have you checked your Diversity Visa (DV) 2017 status recently? Additional entrants have been added to “selected” status! Check your status using your unique confirmation number on ...


3

You are correct. You should file the I-130. See the USCIS page Bringing Spouses to Live in the United States as Permanent Residents. (Note, lower on the page, that special conditions may apply if you are a member of the US military.) After the I-130 petition is approved, your spouse will generally apply for an immigrant visa using form DS-260. There are ...


3

Technically, at the point you are applying (at the border), you would not really be in Canada (as you don't have any visitor or residence status in Canada). Just put USA and since you're a US citizen too, they'll just skip right over that part. After all, you'll be standing right in front of the officer, it'll be obvious to them where you are. They won't ...


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