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29

This is described on the IRS site on individual and shared responsibility question 12. Are US citizens living abroad subject to the individual shared responsibility provision? Yes. However, U.S. citizens who are not physically present in the United States for at least 330 full days within a 12-month period are treated as having minimum essential ...


23

Currently, if you take a non-policy position in a foreign government, you cannot lose your U.S. citizenship without going in front of a U.S. consular official and saying you want to give up U.S. citizenship. If you take a policy position, it's more complicated but the government still needs to prove you intended to lose U.S. citizenship from "preponderance ...


21

Awkward history for this question. It was posted in Travel (where it is most topical) and then reviewed for a being a duplicate. It's not a duplicate IMHO because there was a previous refusal. Then moved to Expats by an inept moderator (without submission to the review queue), thus separating it from all of the related questions involving Paragraph 320 (7A). ...


18

The US taxes all its citizens. Where you live is of no consequence for that fact. You may be eligible for tax treaty benefits, or foreign earned income exclusion, but you're still liable to the US for your taxes and must submit a tax return if you qualify for any benefits or exclusions and want to claim them. Otherwise you're taxed the same (or ...


16

According to PassportsUSA.com: With respect to loss of nationality, 349(a)(4) of the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA), as amended, is the applicable section of law. Pursuant to 349(a)(4), accepting, serving in, or performing duties of in a foreign government is a potentially expatriating act. In order to come within the Act, the person must either be ...


15

There are many countries in the world that do not recognize dual nationalities. So for example: Ukraine. In order to obtain Ukrainian citizenship you have to give up any other citizenships you may have held, which means that if you want to work for the government in Ukraine in a position which which requires citizenship the normal procedure is that you ...


15

You're a US citizen, subject to US tax disclosure requirements. (Even expatriates are subject to this.) US law requires banks dealing with US citizens to inform the Internal Revenue Service of certain information. In this case, the W-9 form will provide the IRS with some information about your tax obligations in France, which will help them determine if ...


14

This is a multi-step process. Each one of these documents will require individual attention and trips to various offices. But it can be done. Before going into specifics, it is important to know where to go. Tel Aviv or Jerusalem: There are three US government offices in Israel which will be able to help you with processing your forms: the embassy in Tel ...


14

Having done the reverse - moved to the USA from the UK, I feel your pain. I moved in 2008 when banks were crashing. The primary way I found of doing this was to use a Secured Card, and I found an example of one from Capital One UK (but I'm sure there are others): http://www.capitalone.co.uk/support/faqs-secured-card.jsf With a secured card, you give them ...


14

In general, Americans abroad are considered to 'reside' in their last state and county of residence before leaving the country. The Federal Voter Assistance Program has a very informative website on this subject: Your "legal State of residence" for voting purposes is the address where you last resided immediately prior to your departure from the U.S. ...


13

The US doesn't have a "tax residency/non-residency" notion for its citizens/permanent residents. If you're a US citizen/permanent resident - you're considered to be under the US tax jurisdiction, wherever you are and wherever you get your income from. However, the US law allows certain ways to avoid double taxation (for example, foreign tax credit or ...


13

It's relatively easy, yes, but there are several caveats: You need to become a resident in France before you apply (and this requirement is assessed more broadly than residence for, say, tax purposes). It's reasonably easy if you have family/marry someone (a registered partnership or PACS is good too), not so much if you want to qualify for a work permit ...


12

You will need to cancel your US Citizenship and much more beyond that. You will have to: Move abroad and make your new home in a (lower/no-tax) foreign nation so you are no longer a “resident” for U.S. income taxes; Obtain alternative citizenship and passport; Give up U.S. citizenship and change your legal “domicile” to avoid U.S. estate taxes; Arrange ...


12

In the United States, individual States tax residents and non-residents. Many States tax residents on worldwide income, but non-residents are generally taxed on income sourced in that State only. So if you're not a Kansas resident, then you only pay KS taxes on income you received in KS. Kansas defines tax resident as follows: A Kansas resident for ...


12

The US does not generally restrict its citizens from having other nationalities. This doesn't depend on the number of other nationalities. The same caveats that apply to dual nationality also apply, however. Taking another nationality is one of the statutory "potentially expatriating acts," but one cannot be deprived of US citizenship involuntarily, so ...


11

The $10K limit is aggregate. You might have had a filing obligation in prior years as well, if the total of all of your accounts together in any one day was $10K or more. If you have more than $10K on a single account - yes, you're required to file FBAR, and you're required to list all of your accounts. Pay attention: FBAR is not only for classical bank ...


11

Most countries don't tax their citizens, only their residents. The most notable exception is the US. In the EU countries however you only need to pay tax if you are a resident there. More specifically in Italy: If you live in Italy for more than 183 days in a year, or your life is centered in Italy and you are in the Population Registry: You must pay tax on ...


10

Supplemental to Karlson's excellent answer, I want to add a few points about where the PPACA can pose problems for expats. While it is true that you do not need to worry about the individual mandate while living abroad (according to the rules in his answer), there are particularly nasty implications of this mandate for expats anyway and being aware of these ...


10

You don't need to register your marriage, and you don't have to register your children. Children of US citizens born abroad are considered citizens, however if you want it to be official and for them to get passports then you will need to go to the embassy with your children (having your spouse as well is a good thing), along with the forms and proofs needed ...


10

If you are employed through a company in Georgia you most likely have to pay taxes there. See this from Georgia's Department of Revenue website FAQs. Q: What are the filing requirements for a nonresident who works in Georgia and/or has other Georgia source income? A: Nonresidents, who work in Georgia or receive income from Georgia sources and are ...


10

You need to provide more information. Whether the child is automatically a U.S. citizen at birth depends on the details of the situation: If the child was born in wedlock, and the U.S. citizen parent was physically present in the U.S. for 5 years before the child's birth, including 2 after turning 14, the child is automatically a U.S. citizen at birth. ...


10

I've also found this link which states so as long you physically worked out of the country you qualify. Perhaps it is left up to interpretation but it seems there is reason to believe based on research that income earned abroad no matter whence it comes is considered foreign-source. U.S.-Source vs. Foreign-Source Income Determination of whether ...


10

You must report gifts from foreign persons in excess of $100K annually on form 3520 attached to your tax return. There's no tax, only reporting, but failure to report will trigger a $10000 penalty. Note that related persons are not excluded from this requirement, so while transfer between spouses which are both US residents are exempt from gift tax and ...


9

You can look at the Your Payments while Outside US from Social Security Administration. On pages 12 and 13 of the booklet you can find the list of countries where you cannot receive the payments, which currently includes: Cuba North Korea Azerbaijan Belarus Georgia Kazakhstan Kyrgyzstan Moldova Tajikistan Turkmenistan Ukraine, Uzbekistan There are ...


9

The US (as well as many other countries that do not have diplomatic relations with the ROC) has an embassy in all but name in Taiwan. It's called the American Institute in Taiwan (AIT). It is staffed with US diplomatic personnel like other US embassies, handles the usual embassy and consulate business like issuing US passports and visas, the "director" is ...


8

The US does not have an easy way to get the exact equivalent of the UK CRB. The US State Dept has a page on this very subject: U.S. citizens may be asked to present a “certificate of good conduct” or “lack of a criminal record” for a variety of reasons for use abroad including adoption, school attendance, employment, etc. U.S. law enforcement ...


8

I know of only one territory that seems to fit your requirements: Svalbard. The US is a signatory of the Svalbard treaty and as a US citizen you don't need to transit through Norway so you could in principle just board a plane and take up residence in Svalbard. Life is not necessarily cheap or easy there. There are some countries where retirees can get ...


8

They need to pay FICA taxes enough to accumulate 40 credits (i.e.: 10 years with ~16K taxable wages/year). They do not have to be citizens for that, so taxes they already paid also count. Otherwise, if they're over 65 they'll be eligible for medicare 5 years after getting their green card, but may need to pay the premium for medicare part A.


8

OK, I wasn't able to find an answer to my question through my own research, so I sought out 2 different lawyers and paid each of them about 100 EUR for a consultation (which amounted to an hour in an office reviewing my case and answering any of my specific questions). The price worth it to me for peace of mind and a thorough understanding of my options. ...


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