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2

I submitted a FOIA request to the CBP for entry and exit records on 2020-10-21 and got a response with those records on 2020-12-10. I have no idea if that time is typical or not. The fee charged for this was $25. The data was delivered online at https://www.foiaonline.gov. It looked a lot like an Excel spreadsheet printout.


2

Since you guys married before you got your green card, she is eligible to immigrate as your derivative beneficiary, either at the same time as, or any time after, you become a permanent resident (as long as you are still a permanent resident). You don't need to petition her with I-130 to immigrate as the spouse of a permanent resident. In the case where the ...


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I found some contradictory feedback: https://citizenpath.com/faq/find-travel-records-n-400-application/ If you are unable to locate your travel history records through the methods listed above, you can submit a Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) request to U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP). Generally, personal FOIA requests are free (if less than 100 ...


2

Eligibility is based on nativity, i.e. country of birth, as per the most recent instructions (see below). There are ways to use a different country for eligibility purposes, but these relate to spouses and parents. Citizenship does not directly factor into those ways. The official DV instructions are quite specific and do go into quite a lot of detail about ...


6

Yes, country of chargeability for the Diversity Visa works like country of chargeability for other US immigration visas. It is based on the country of birth, not the country of citizenship. So someone born in a country that is eligible for DV is eligible even if they have always had solely the nationality of a non-eligible country. Conversely, someone who is ...


1

Written test — Yes. Road test - Unlikely in the past, and even less likely in these COVID times, but always possible. It'd be best to be prepared to demonstrate your driving abilities. The applicant must provide the car. Note that DMV examiners usually inspect the car's documentation to make sure its registration is current and insurance is in force. ...


2

Many countries only provide (routine) consular services to people who reside lawfully in the consulate's district. The basis of your lawful residence in the US is your US nationality; if you were not a US citizen they would require you to show a US visa, I-94 form, or other documentary evidence of lawful immigration status before they would help you with ...


4

A petition is automatically void when the petitioner dies. There are some very limited exceptions. One is if you (the beneficiary) were residing in the US at the time the petitioner died, and continues to reside in the US now, you can seek INA 204(l) reinstatement. There is also humanitarian reinstatement for if you have some very special humanitarian reason....


2

I have been there, Korean license in NY state. Drive the car in my current situation (or would I, for example, need to get a US driving license)? Yes, you can drive here as long as you are not a NY state resident. There are many interpretations of the laws but as I understood it is referred if you spend of 3 months in the state [1]. Afterwards, you can ...


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You must complete the form truthfully. At the time you're completing the form — now — you are not employed because your postdoc has not yet begun. Therefore, the correct response is "not employed." If you think the examiner may wonder why an unemployed person is seeking a J1 visa, then add that you couldn't find a job after graduation because of ...


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