New answers tagged

2

I'm not familiar with the requirements of the DS-260. However, usually the requirements for portraits are the same as passport pictures. So just take pictures as if you would be applying for a passport and submit to them.


0

While you can have a friend or family member translate the documents (my understanding is that as long as they speak english they can translate), I would recommend a translation service like immitranslate or similar. The charges are not excessive and gives you peace of mind knowing that USCIS won't give you a hard time. To answer some of your other questions,...


3

They can travel to Canada or Mexico, but if they do so they will abandon their application for extension of status. Any subsequent attempt to enter the United States will be treated as a new application for admission in B-2 status. In theory, this looks attractive because yes, they can indeed get a new I-94 with an extended date. Another possibility, ...


0

By the person being "in the US", I will assume you mean they are considered a resident (US citizen or resident alien) for US tax purposes. In that case, their India-sourced income will be subject to both Indian and US tax. However, even without a tax treaty, they will be able to claim the Foreign Tax Credit on their US tax return, reducing their US ...


1

"What are the tax implications of remaining an employee of a US company in Canada? If you become a tax resident of Canada then, as far as I am aware , you can not be employed by a US company. In very broad strokes, employee as a concept only works domestically in general everywhere. You'd need to become a contractor or you company would need a Canadian ...


2

But what about all of the rest of the countries in the world? The priority date for those countries is the date shown for "all chargeability areas except those listed." You can also find a column named "All Chargeability Areas Except Those Listed". What's this? See above. It's the date that applies to every unlisted country (or other ...


2

The country of chargeability is generally the country of birth. The only exception that takes citizenship into account applies to people born in the US. See 8 USC 1152(b). Therefore, unless the brother was born in the US, he will be placed in the India queue. The sponsor's nationality does not matter, nor does the sponsor's country of chargeability under ...


1

The current (Sep 2020) visa bulletin shows that for the F4 category for people born in India, visa numbers are currently available for priority dates (i.e. for I-130 filed) before March 8, 2005 (about 15.5 years ago). So if the wait remains the same in the future, you can expect a visa number to be available for your petition in about 2029 (though the wait ...


2

The diversity visa always opens at the beginning of October. As far as I am aware, this is because the US federal government's accounting year runs from October 1st through September 30th. I have found some unofficial sources saying that the 2022 program will go ahead as usual in October 2020, but I haven't found any official source. Given the current ...


3

No. There is no practical difference for an employer between a permanent resident and a citizen. Employers do have to check employees' authorization to work, but they do not have to maintain on file a record of the current basis of each employee's authorization. They need to reverify authorization for employees whose authorization expires, but permanent ...


3

You can stay in the US for as long as the immigration officer at entry admits you for. You can leave the US and seek to re-enter the US as soon as you want. So, for example, if you were admitted for 6 months as a B2 visitor the first time, you can leave the US, immediately turn around and seek to re-enter, and, if the immigration officer decides to admit you ...


Top 50 recent answers are included