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If you are a resident in the UK (which for this purpose includes if you just moved there with the intent of working and living in the UK), you cannot drive a non-UK car in the UK. Since there are no residency cards in the UK, whenever you are stopped by a police officer and he thinks you are actually a resident (for example if you have a UK driving licence, ...


8

Yes, you can, for a while. (Not long enough to get a degree, though.) From Number Plates on the NZTA site: Overseas visitor registration plates – on vehicles brought in by visitors. So long as the vehicle displays plates from its home country, visitors’ cars can drive on New Zealand roads without paying registration and licensing fees. The vehicle must ...


4

I could not find many details on this 14-day rule but all the sources I found, including the EU website suggest that it only applies to people who are just moving into the country. So it means you must register the car/motorcycle within 14 days of becoming a resident, and not 14 days of importing the vehicle. Basically, it seems it's intended to cover a car ...


4

In France you have to abide the common EU rules about using non-local, EU registered cars. This means that normally a resident in a country cannot drive a non-local, but EU registered car unless: If the car is not yours, the registered owner is not a resident in that country, and he is sitting with you in the car (like a car owned by foreign family member, ...


4

While it's true that legally if you move to the UK, you are not able to drive a non-UK car there, in practice this is not enforced (for people who just moved to the UK - for long term residents it's different and there were some crackdowns on non-UK registered cars that were parked for a long time in the same place in some areas), and it would be really hard ...


3

Once you are deemed to be a resident, you're not allowed to drive a car registered abroad (except if the owner of the car is also present), otherwise it would be too easy to circumvent all the other obligations. Consequently, you will not be able to drive with your parents' car while residing in France (see also europa.eu). If you would be the owner of the ...


3

I haven't read/seen a source for this yet, but a lawyer friend of a friend has told us the following: I cannot own/register a car in Mexico without a Mexico driver license. I can drive a Mexican owned/registered car without a Mexico driver license (as long as I have a valid license from another country), and the owner's vehicle insurance will cover us We ...


2

Mr Spence is actually wrong, your car must be registered in the country you live in. To claim that to have a car in France is legally on UK plates despite being french registered is bull. He has, one assumes, a french carte grise (equivalent to our V5 log book) on which he will find his new registation number in the top left hand corner. It should be in the ...


2

Sounds like the world has gone mad to me, I drive in and out of the uk when I like, I have a LEGAL French Registered vehicle which is insured and MOT'd in France every 2yrs as per their regulations, my French Insurer allows me to drive into ANY EU Country for up to 365days a year, why, becasue we are in Europe, open frontiers and all that. I am not a French ...


2

The information on the UK government web site you linked seems clear to me. I suspect you have simply misread it. The relevant part appears to be: Customs relief for non-EU vehicles You may be able to claim relief from customs charges if your vehicle is registered outside the EU and you’re bringing it to the UK temporarily. This is known as ‘...


2

You've got bigger problems than the vehicle. As an EU citizen, making an extended stay in Spain: after three months in Spain, you are considered resident (Spanish-only, I'm afraid). You must apply to be included in the Central Register of Foreigners before the three months are up. after six months, you must have imported your car, which can be expensive ...


2

There is a process, a form to complete, and a payment (DKK 400), with comprehensive all the information found at SKAT.dk Application for permission to drive a foreign-registered motor vehicle in Denmark, Form no. 21.059 EN About this form You must complete this form to apply for permission to drive a foreign-registered vehicle in Denmark. You will ...


2

Got an answer from Regitra today: Temporary/transit plates (red letters on white background) can be assigned to anyone, including persons who cannot provide a proof of residence or regular abode in Lithuania. They have a validity of one month. Regular (black-on-white) plates require a registered residence in Lithuania. There is a way to get a six-month ...


2

I was waiting to see if anyone with actual facts to offer would answer this, but since not I'll offer an opinion that may be a little light on facts. As in the US, in Mexico vehicle registration and driver licensing is the responsibility of the individual Mexican states and requirements may vary from state to state (Baja has two, Sur and norte). That said, I ...


1

This UK govt page describes the steps to be taken to import a vehicle into the UK. Here's the text from that page: How to import a vehicle You must complete certain steps as soon as you bring a vehicle into the UK permanently. You can pay an importer or shipping company to do them for you. Tell HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) within 14 days that the ...


1

No. If you become resident in the UK, you must register (and pay tax on) your vehicle within two weeks. The police are very strict on this as there's a big problem with people registering cars in cheaper countries with less stringent roadworthiness rules, so you're likely to get the car seized if they spot you. https://www.gov.uk/importing-vehicles-into-...


1

You're going to be a resident of France, and as such you will have one month to re-register a car with foreign plates which you take with you. http://www.frenchpropertylinks.com/essential/registering-car-france.html : Your UK driving licence is valid in France until it expires, while you are allowed to keep UK plates for up to six months if you are a non-...


1

This UK Government webpage and a slew of other SE answers confirm that as a UK resident, you cannot enter the UK with an EU vehicle. EU (and perhaps other) cars can be brought into the UK by tourists for up to 6 months, but UK residents cannot do this.


1

There are 'expediters' in MX who can assist you with registration of the car in other US states, including providing you with a mailing address in that state with notice forwarding to your address in MX. Ask around the expat community.


1

You will need to be a resident in Spain, as you will need to provide you foreign resident number alongside your passport. Link to the official documentation at gob.es : https://sede.dgt.gob.es/Galerias/tramites-y-multas/tu-coche/matriculacion/08/08-Matriculacion-ordinaria-vehiculos-INGLES-04-04-2016.pdf


1

I've been trying to find a definite answer around this issue, but couldn't really, so anything below is mainly speculation, and assumes that by "the continent" you mean an EU state in mainland Europe. Norwey, Switzerland and other non-EU countries might be different, and there local laws will apply. If you check the EU's site, they say the 6 month ...


1

Peter Taylor is correct. However please note that, in Spain, both your car and caravan need to be registered. So, let's say you do import/register your car in Spain, you can't simply tow your UK caravan; you will need to get that registered as well. Since Brexit, the Spanish authorities have really started to clamp down on UK cars. In the past, it was ...


1

If you are in the UK, and only want insurance for the UK and Spain, you can re-register the vehicle in the UK as an imported vehicle. It would then be issued with a "Q" prefix number plate. ( This is relatively common across the EU. Germany (certainly used to) require vehicles owned by ex-pat residents to be re-registered with German plates, for example....


1

The insurance firms are incredible devious .most insurance companies tell you you have to inform them after 30 days if you continue to use your car in Europe and charge.some on a daily basics the truth is your insurance gets downgraded to third party fire and theft .As regards to how long you stay with the vechicle in one country it is also misleading stated ...


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