5

Under Section 212 of the Immigration and Nationality Act (or I.N.A.) you are very clearly inadmissible as the possible sentence exceeded one year. In theory you could apply for a so called 212(d)(3) nonimmigrant waiver but your chances are extremely low because you committed the crime less than 15 years ago (except in a case of prostitution for which there ...


5

It means that the salary offered by your prospective employer is deemed too low compared to the local standard for similar occupations by the relevant Arbeitsagentur. The law cited, “§ 39 (2) 1 Nr. 1 Residence Act” is meant to protect local workers (citizens and current residents) against competition from newcomers accepting less attractive work conditions. ...


4

The UK Ancestry Visa page ( https://www.gov.uk/ancestry-visa ) says I need an offer That is not correct. It says that you need "evidence that you’re planning to work in the UK." It then goes on to give examples of such evidence, one of which is "job offers you’ve received." You can submit other evidence instead, but I do not know how ...


4

I have no direct experience nor any additional information beyond what's on the website but I happened to have had to look into the rules recently and they seem relatively clear to me. If you have been in the Netherlands (and not merely the EU) between your 2-month 2019 trip and your 4-month 2020 trip, none of your stays would trigger them: Since 2015, you ...


3

The Answer posted by @phoog is correct, and is explained in more detail by the UK Ancestry Guidance cited in Traveller's comment. Page 17 of 37 of the Guidance says: The applicant does not have to be working at the time they apply. They need only demonstrate they are able to work and intend to take and seek employment. Evidence of this could include, but is ...


3

I can officially confirm that this is possible. Of course, under the condition that new job is in the same field and that the salary is still high enough for a Blue Card. If your employer name is not written on your Zusatzblatt, your Blue Card is not tied to them. This confirmation I got from the foreigners agency directly. What you do need to do is ...


3

It would not directly help your visa application. Under EU law, your freedom of movement rights are derived from those of your spouse: if she (wants to) live in Switzerland, you have the right to join her. That means for example that if she gets a job in Switzerland, you automatically qualify for a visa/residence permit that does allow you to work in ...


2

I am not sure I completely follow your plan but it sounds like you are making this needlessly complicated. The key thing to understand is that both (personal) taxes and residence permit/long-stay visas are largely national matters (tax law can be impacted by bilateral agreements but even EU countries don't always have one). There are only a few rules and no ...


2

As I have received Blue Card finally I am updating the answer for anyone interested: Once you reach Germany on German national Visa, do the following (based on my experience) Get a flat/residence. make a rental agreement. Go to the City office and register to get 'Anmeldung'. Get health insurance and obtain a certificate for the same. Obtain an appointment ...


2

The process is that you apply for a D-Visa at the consulate with all needed documentation work contract position with salary qualifications etc. This data will then be sent by the consulate to the local authority in Germany and decided there. They will make the decision on what type of residence permit will be issued after arrival based on the most ...


2

Yes, that is correct. Since 2020-01-01, the former Berliner Ausländerbehörde is called Landesamt für Einwanderung. It often takes time for such name changes to be used consistently and often even longer before many becomes aware or used to the name change. Since most towns (or county (Kreis)) in Germany have one for their areas of responsiblity, the name ...


2

Every so often we get questions like this from people with names that seem Arabic or Turkish or Muslim (for example, named after some prominent figure in the history of Islam). Frequently, these names are obviously common. My suspicion is that their names are similar to names on some watch list or another. Whether this or some other reason is the cause of ...


2

Just after relocation on high skilled visa, you'll have Stamp 1. That's basic immigration status. Your spouse will have Stamp 1G or Stamp 3 (depending on some regulations). All those stamps (1, 1G, 3) don't allow you or your spouse starting a company or being a contractor in Ireland. So options 3,4,5 violate your both immigration status. Options 1 and 2 don'...


1

I see two major hurdles which you'd need to overcome. Firstly, you would need to convince the company that the not-insignificant expense in both their time and money would be outweighed by having you working on-site in their office in the USA instead of remotely from London. Secondly, the company would have to convince the US Dept of Labor that there are no ...


1

You need a permission for work at Company B on the first working day there. IMHO (and I'm not a lawyer), you can either reapply for new visa, or enter with current visa and apply for residence permit. But you will only be able to start working at Company B when this new visa or residence permit is issued.


1

The BlueCard would be only one of several problems. If one will be an employee, I'm not sure if US companies can hire him/her as employee in Germany (then they might need to be legally presented here, or he/she needs a service company in-between). Besides that, one may need a permission from his/her main employer in Germany to work for others or himself/...


1

I had the same question and emailed Bundesagentur für Arbeit (BA). In my case, the officer said that, with the internship study-related, and less than 90 days within 12 months, and during my study after 4th semester in H+ institution and thus under 15.6 there is no need for BA's 'Einvernehmen' because it is not considered an employment (BeschV § 30 Nr. 2;...


1

Your work permit is the status document allowing to work in Canada and reside in Canada for that purpose. The visa is an entry document allowing to enter Canada. In many countries, a work or residence permit can act as a visa and no separate entry permission is required. Canada is not one of those countries. If you need to leave and re-enter Canada with a ...


1

The normal process is that such an application is made at a consulate, which they then send on to the responsible Ausländerbehörde for approval, afterwhich the visa is issued. So I am not sure what benifit you wish to achieve by bypassing the standard procedure, since you don't have a permanent residence card of Italy - but a researcher permit. I assume with ...


1

No. I-140 is the petition for employment-based immigration (analogous to I-130 which is the petition for family-based immigration).


1

"What are the tax implications of remaining an employee of a US company in Canada? If you become a tax resident of Canada then, as far as I am aware , you can not be employed by a US company. In very broad strokes, employee as a concept only works domestically in general everywhere. You'd need to become a contractor or you company would need a Canadian ...


1

No, you may not apply for a Blue Card because your spouse has one. You can only apply for a Blue Card if you yourself fulfill the Blue Card conditions. A spouse of a residence permit holder can apply for a dependent residence permit based on § 27 AufthG. Such permits are generally issued in 1 year periods (§27(4)). Exceptions exist for certain residence ...


1

The first sentence of § 81a AufenthG reads Arbeitgeber können bei der zuständigen Ausländerbehörde in Vollmacht des Ausländers, der zu einem Aufenthaltszweck nach den §§ 16a, 16d, 18a, 18b und 18c Absatz 3 einreisen will, ein beschleunigtes Fachkräfteverfahren beantragen. The EU Blue card is controlled by § 18b so it is covered by the fast-track procedure (...


1

Yes, there is no rule against having several residence permit. The Schengen regulations are about visits and short stays and have very little to say on stays longer than 90 days and residence. EU law does have some rules about that but each member state remains largely free to manage immigration as they see fit. Usually what you envision would be difficult ...


1

Your daughter can get M1 to go to vocational school in the US. For you, you might be able to go on B2 visitor status to accompany her, but you cannot work on B2.


1

There is a lot of confusion about this issue and it's difficult to find explicit confirmation but your understanding seems right to me. This document from the Bundesagentur für Arbeit touches upon it: Brauchen Praktikantinnen/Praktikanten ein Visum? Staatsangehörige der EU-Staaten benötigen zur Einreise in die Bundesrepublik Deutschland kein Visum. ...


1

The answer to your question will change depending on how you respond to @Relaxed's comment above. If the license was obtained by passing the Czech license test, then no need to exchange (based on the links below) If the license was obtained by exchanging a Bolivian license for a Czech license, then there might be a need to pass the test in France. This is ...


1

I see no reason it should be suspended. You should in fact be able to exchange it for a French license, for free. The clause she signed is probably slightly different: In the EU, you are not allowed to pass the test outside of your country of residence. In particular, you are not supposed to go shop for an “easy“ state to pass the test or circumvent a ...


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