New answers tagged

0

I came across something curious: The European Union Blue Card directive applies to highly qualified non-EU nationals seeking to be admitted to the territory of a Member State of the European Union (common European Union immigration policy), excluding Denmark, Ireland and the United Kingdom, for more than three months for the purposes of employment ...


-2

§ 19a (1)(1)(b) states: if he has a comparable qualification demonstrated by at least five years of professional experience So your 7 years is fine. Section 19a EU Blue Card (1) A foreigner shall be granted an EU Blue Card pursuant to Council Directive 2009/50/EC of 25 May 2009 on the conditionsonditions of entry and residence of third-country ...


1

You don't need to do anything special to return. As far as which visa is preferable for your husband, it probably makes little practical difference once the visa is granted. In both cases, if you intend to stay in the UK long term, your husband will need to extend his visa once, and then apply for indefinite leave to remain after having lived in the UK for 5 ...


0

Just apply for a current UK passport if you don't already have one, and that's it. Your husband should apply for a Family Visa.


1

If you do not plan to finish your degree, without leaving Germany, it is only possible to apply for a Blue Card (of course, only if you satisfy requirements, i.e. have higher education degree and an offer with high salary). See https://www.bamf.de/SharedDocs/Anlagen/DE/EMN/Studien/wp67-emn-wechsel-aufenthaltstiteln-aufenthaltszwecken.pdf?__blob=...


0

Until one moved to Berlin, his/her documents are in the immigration office (Ausländerbehörde) of the place where he/she lives. So in such cases, one needs to go to the Ausländerbehörde of the place where he/she is registered. They can actually issue a new card for you, even if the job is in Berlin. Of course, one could first move to Berlin, register there ...


4

Research the countries that you are considering. Especially look at immigration rules (and the associated pain in the neck), job market, cost of living, general culture, language barriers, etc. Take another look at immigration, visa types, and required sponsorships. Cross check with available jobs. Visit the countries (time and money permitting) to get see ...


1

During all of my research on the German work visa, I have never heard of anyone being refused for not having a resignation letter. It's not an official requirement, and it's not listed anywhere in the official resources. I was never asked this question, even though I applied for this visa twice.


Top 50 recent answers are included