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How does it work concerning a foreign citizen holding a EU PR willing to move and to settle in another EU country? Does he have to convert his EU PR to the one of the country he's moving to or will the destination country's authorities request/withdraw his PR card and give him a temporary card ? Or will he simply need another visa? I'm not talking about movement or circulation for tourism purposes, I'm clearly talking about settlement and seeking work.

  • I believe PR would be specific to a country? If you have PR in Belgium and move to France, then you don't have a PR in France but still have it in Belgium (until it expires?). You can potentially acquire 2 PRs if you have moved to a new EU country and occasionally travel back in order for the PR in that country not to expire and continuously living for 5 years in the new country to finally acquire PR there. – kiradotee Mar 1 at 2:45
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    @us er What is your citizenship? Your long-stay visa or residence permit allows you to travel to another Schengen area country for 90 days per 180 day period travel.stackexchange.com/questions/11114/… It doesn’t allow you to settle in another Schengen country – Traveller Mar 1 at 7:25
  • I'm an EU citizen, the issue concerns my father. – us er Mar 1 at 13:55
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    @kiradotee Nevertheless I've been told that there'a framework of conversion regarding PR cards, since the EU includes regulations and frameworks about these things as well (I don't know how however). I've been told that if a PR from an EU country wants to settle in another EU country, he has to give up his PR card to the authorities of the destination country which will issue him a temporary residence card, not a PR card, he has basically to trade it out with those authorities according to what I've been told. – us er Mar 1 at 18:20
  • @kiradotee hence I don't know whether he can hold two PRs or not, but if he can, then he has to obtain a visa to settle there, and then obtain other residence cards afterwards, otherwise he has to trade his PR card out for a temporary one. He's not a EU citizen, rather he holds a passport that needs a visa in order to enter Europe with. – us er Mar 1 at 18:25
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If you have permanent residence in an EU country then you are able to move to another EU country and stay there for more than 3 months to live or work which the need for a Visa (Except UK (still covered by the withdrawal agreement until end of 2020), Ireland, & Denmark).

Source: https://ec.europa.eu/immigration/general-information/already-eu_en

As a long-term resident in one EU country, can I live and work in a second EU country?

Yes. You can stay in a second EU country for more than three months for purposes including work, study or training, if you apply for and are granted a residence permit in this second country.

This means however that you must apply for and be granted residency rights in the second/other EU country.

This means that you must still meet all the requirements for obtaining residency in this country which may include:

  • Stable and regular financial resources to maintain yourself and your family;
  • Health insurance;
  • Appropriate accommodation;
  • If you wish to take up a job, evidence of employment;
  • If you are self-employed, evidence that you have sufficient financial funds;
  • If you wish to study or train, proof that you are registered to do so.
  • Comply with integration measures such as language requirements (if applicable)

Also be aware, that if you become a resident in another EU country that you will eventually lose permanent residency status in the original EU country. This should occur after a period of approx 6 years. Which means that you have had sufficient time to gain permanent residency in your second EU country. Although this will of course be subject to such conditions as applied in that country.

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