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What's the proper order for the "Countries to Which You Traveled"? that one has to indicate in the travel history in the N-400 Application for Naturalization Form (mirror)?

I wonder whether the order should be chronological, antichronological, lexicographical, some of other order or nobody cares. I also wonder whether I should list country A twice if I went to US-> country A -> country B -> country A -> US.

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  • Please note that they want "Countries to Which You Traveled" It's "Countries" (plural) , not "Country".
    – Nobody
    Sep 25 at 11:13
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I wonder whether the order should be chronological, antichronological, lexicographical, some of other order or nobody cares.

As the form states: Start with your most recent trip and work backwards.

  • which is antichronological

They want a unique list of countries visited during that trip:

  • country A, country B
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  • There is one more question you have not answered yet. Should it be A, B or A,, B, A ?
    – Nobody
    Sep 25 at 12:19
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    @scaaahu From the way the heading is written, the list should be unique. Otherwise they would probably have written 'Order of Countries to which you have traveled through'. Sep 25 at 12:46
  • I think you're right. I asked the question for the OP, not myself. I naturalized long time ago. I remember I put in A, B, not A,B,A. I believe what the form is looking for is the time the applicant stayed outside US, not really the order of the countries you traveled.
    – Nobody
    Sep 25 at 13:10
  • Sorry I realized my question was ambiguous: I meant to ask, for a given trip outside the US where I visited more than 1 countries, in which order should I list the country? E.g. if I flew US -> Germany -> France -> US, should I list "Germany, France" or "France, Germany"? From your comments and answers it seems that this order doesn't matter. Sep 25 at 21:50

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