Podcast #128: We chat with Kent C Dodds about why he loves React and discuss what life was like in the dark days before Git. Listen now.
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If you're lucky, all of your devices will have a label stating what electrical conditions they work under. Your big care is voltage. (I can't speak so much to frequency.) Here are a few real labels to give you an idea of what you might encounter: Examples Input: 110V ~60Hz 7W : Won't work in the 220V area. Input: 220V ~50Hz 7W : Will work in the 220V, but ...


7

Most modern televisions have a range of voltages that they support. If you're picking up a new one, you just need to ensure that the voltage range includes that 120V that you get in the US. As most television is transmitted digitally these days, the concern over signal is not important unless you're hoping to get analog signals. The only difference you'd ...


5

The tuner won't receive over-the-air broadcasts in the US. The digital TV standard in use is different. You will have to use some kind of set-top-box for it to work. Also, all the menus and smart features will be in Japanese only. English support is very rare on domestic models. This could be an issue if you want to use things like Netflix, which are ...


3

From the handy iAmsterdam site Amsterdam Centre District refuse collection Bulky waste Either take bulky refuse to a waste collection point (in Dutch) or telephone 020 256 3555 to register it for free collection. There is no scheduled bulky waste collection in the Centre. Once you have arranged collection, put items on the pavement on the ...


3

One option I'm trying to avoid, but which should work, is: Take a type-F extension chord. Cut the male side (i.e. the plug end of it). Tool: Heavy wire cutter. Open up the cable somewhat. Tool: Utility knife. Expose the 3 wires' copper. Tool: Careful work with a utility knife or wire exposre tool + pulling. Buy a self-assembly Type-H plug at a hardware ...


2

Most PC power supplies nowadays can take a wide range of voltages, without the need for a manual switch. For example, the HP Z420 workstation cites an operating voltage range of 90–269 VAC, and a rated voltage range of 100-240 VAC. (Importantly for the Japanese case, it can also take both 50 and 60 Hz AC.) If your computer's from one of the big OEMs, this ...


2

You have two options: Use your PC as is with an external 110-to-220V transformer. Straightforward, but make sure the transformer's wattage is sufficient for your PC and that it's a high-quality model suitable for extended use. (Cheap, underpowered ones have a disturbing tendency to catch fire if overloaded for long periods of time.) Replace your PC's ...


1

They certainly do exist, try googling "israel schuko adapter" for example. That gives me something like this Skross 1.500216 (just a random pick for illustration, no recommendation implied), which clearly has the two grounding spring contacts. You can probably find a cheaper non-universal alternative with a bit more googling. Alternatively, what about ...


1

Yes, you use them without any problem. Some of them want an earthed/grounded plug to reach maximum speed, but without that they still work (though slower). As for personal experience: I used a pair in a old flat (1950-ish build?) and in my parent house (1975-ish with lots of different power groups and 16 fuses. Basically one fuse per room). No problems ...


1

Just the "why": Some equipment uses the voltage supplied directly, like a light bulb, washing machine, lawn mower. To run properly, you need Watts. And Watt = Volt times Ampere. To get the same number of Watts with half the Volts, US devices are designed to use twice the current (Ampere) of a European device. Plug that kind of 110 Volt device into 220 Volt, ...


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