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11

As stated by moomoochoo, Shinsei Bank is very handy for remittances overseas, so if you still have residence (for instance, you worked there and have permanent residency and have a valid address you can use to register for the bank account), then I strongly suggest you open an account during your next visit as soon as possible (opening an account needs to be ...


11

I have a couple of suggestions: In the past, I had a simple savings account with Shinsei bank. When overseas I could withdraw the money from most ATMs using a simple debit card. This method was easy (probably the easiest way you will get), but you would need to determine how cost effective it is. From memory I believe it was ok. Another option would be to ...


10

The procedure to change your status of residence while in Japan is described here (so the first thing to note is that there is such a procedure at all, so it is possible to at least apply to have your status changed). When you enter Japan for a short-term stay, as with a tourism visa or with a visa-free 90 days landing permission, your status is "Temporary ...


10

In principle, you could face a fine of up to 200,000 yen (that's in the same category as, for example, not carrying your residence card when you go out); in practice I have never heard of anybody who was fined for this. In any case, you do not face imprisonment or deportation (that would have been the case if you had made a false notification, as opposed to ...


10

Domestic flights in Japan do not require ID of any kind, there are no (regular) ID checks at check-in or on the plane. However, Japanese law requires you to carry your zairyu card at all times, whether flying on a plane or not.


9

fkraiem has already provided a fantastic answer, I just want to add my personal experience. Yesterday I notified the Immigration Bureau of Japan via their e-system. They said on their site that additional inquiry will be made if deemed necessary. However, I've received an email today which only said that my notification has been recorded. I guess I'm clear ...


7

I also live in Japan. I can't answer about "all" international IDs, but in Japan it's normally surname then first name. Since I have two first names a middle name and a surname, that's four names in total. When opening a bank account or signing a contract, I usually count the number of boxes first before deciding on whether to write my full name (almost ...


7

I am a happy user of Transferwise. I use it to transfer CHF and GBP to EUR, but they do USD to JPY too. It is not entirely fee-free, but they use the mid-market rate for foriegn exchange, and then charge a fee on top. For USD to JPY, the fee scheme is quite complex: A flat fee of $4 0.85% on the amount up to $135,000, and 0.73% on anything over that $...


6

Sorry, but unless this escalates into violence or sexual harassment, I'm afraid you likely have little to no legal recourse. "Power harassment" (パワハラ) and authoritarian bosses like yours are endemic in Japan, and since you're a student, even employment laws and the usual channels for dealing with it don't apply. You have essentially two options, both of ...


6

There are five different types of taxes generally taken from paychecks by employers in Japan: Income tax (所得税) Residence tax (住民税) Pension (厚生年金) Health Insurance (健康保険) Unemployment Insurance (雇用保険) Income tax is covered under Japanese tax laws, and generally is difficult for salaried employees to reduce (barring standard deductions such as having ...


6

Tax treaty doesn't generally cover FICA, only income taxes. Self-employed US citizen will pay payroll taxes (Schedule SE on your tax return) regardless of residency unless a totalization agreement exists. There are much less countries that have a totalization treaty with the US than those who have income tax treaties. Japan does seem to have a totalization ...


5

Generally speaking where your child is born doesn't seem to be a concern for the eligibility for Paternity Leave. You can also try to fill out the form SC3 for your employer to see if the place or country of birth is actually relevant but it doesn't seem to be. But you can check further with your employer's HR department to verify the information and other ...


4

You should look into Bitcoin. Buy Bitcoin on an exchange like Kraken in Japan, and sell it in Germany. It should easily beat the often 10+% fees for remittances from Japan. Checkout reddit.com/r/bitcoin and ask them for help if you don't understand it.


4

For what it's worth, here's my current approach documented for posterity. I'm using Money Partners to do the actual currency exchange, which gives me a pretty good rate which I'm in full control of (you can follow the rate and exchange the minute it's good). I'm then transferring the money to a foreign currency account at Mizuho, and from there I'm wiring it ...


4

I think TransferWise is the best service for sending money out of Japan recently. They have a modern web interface and the rates are very reasonable. I've used them myself to send money to the UK and the process was very smooth. Check out RetireJapan's review: The website is in English, it's simple and easy to use, and everything can be done online ...


4

In theory, yes, it's possible. In practice, not necessarily: While any Korean Embassy or Consulate General overseas should issue a visa to any applicant that meet the application criteria, that is, unfortunately, not always the case - the applicant is always at the mercy of the official dealing with their application & some Embassies or ...


4

For Japan (And many countries): It depends. Lots of people do it, but technically your visa is for tourist purposes, and you're meant to be doing that, not working. If you're working during your stay, you're arguably violating that. It's a grey area, as a lot of people do it (See people working in Chiang Mai, Thailand). In theory, no. However, it's going ...


4

The card is sufficient. I've flown intra-Japan many times, and never brought along my passport.


4

Your questions are covered in their e-Notification System manual, which can be found here. Q71: Is it possible to view notification (contents of notification) submitted using the "e-Notification System"? A: Though you can view the history of notifications submitted in the past in the "届出状況参照画面 (View Notification Status screen)", you cannot view the ...


4

Have you avoided driving in Japan for 25 years? :-) Technically you are not allowed to update your GB licence unless you are a resident of Great Britain. I think the licence exchange program is designed for people that have recently moved countries. As you said even if you updated the address with the help of a contact in Great Britain (ticking the box ...


4

For passports which are ICAO compliant - this question can be answered by referring to the ePassport Standard - ICAO 9303. Specifically you'll need to refer to "Convention for Writing the Name of the Holder": Essentially the Passport standard allows the issuing country to determine which part of the name is: Primary Identifier Secondary Identifier In ...


4

Generally speaking, a Certificate of Eligibility (CoE) is a document that must be obtained from the immigration authorities in Japan as a prerequisite for obtaining most types of long-term Japan visas (though exceptions exist). In your case, the page about long-term visas on the website of the Embassy of Japan in India states When an application for visa ...


4

I don't think you can change just your picture, but according to this link, you can change your non-expired residence card anytime you wish, even if it is not lost or damaged. You will have to pay a 1,300 yen fee. The whole process is documented in the following link. Assuming that you are not changing your name on the card as well, you will need the ...


3

Talk to your employer. Have they gotten a certificate of eligibility for you yet? Here's what the Japanese Embassy in the UK states are required to apply for a work visa: Once a Certificate of Eligibility has been obtained, the applicant should bring in: 1. Valid passport 2. One visa application form (sample), completed and signed 3. One passport-...


3

In Japan, being a "native speaker" is required to obtain Instructor status, which is necessary to teach foreign languages in elementary, junior high and high schools. Technically, what is required is that you have received at least 12 years of education entirely in the language you want to teach (and not just language classes). No such requirement exists ...


3

The same as if the person has simply moved to a different address in Japan. You ideally put a sticker on, or else in a bold colour, put 'no longer at this address' across the letter, and put it back in the mail. This will usually have it returned to sender in most countries. Alternatively, go to a post office with the letters, hand them over and ask "...


3

Just to answer for myself, I have already moved to Osaka, Japan for almost one year. Like Kent said, when I arrived to Osaka, I could enroll in the National Health Insurance Plan (国民健康保険). The Working Holiday period given to me was 6 months (I could extends to 1 year after arrived for 3, 4 months... forgot how many months exactly). But either way, I don't ...


3

I am in a similar situation, a US citizen working full-time in the UK. As far as I am aware the IRS requires you to file an annual tax return that includes ALL your income, whether that is earned in the USA or overseas. All foreign income up to "somewhere around" $80,000 (I forget the exact figure) is exempt from US tax, however above that it's possible that ...


3

You should not have to pay customs charges for your personal effects that you are sending to Japan. While MBE should provide you with the regulations and documents, this fact sheet from Atlas International, a US shipper, is an excellent summary of what is required. Customs Regulations: Narita Airport Customs officials follow strict enforcement of ...


3

This question seems to be based on several misconceptions. While my understanding is that Japanese nationals are able to easily secure good health insurance and afford the medicine/treatment for this Indeed, "Japanese nationals are able to easily secure good health insurance"; but so is everyone who legally resides in Japan, regardless of nationality or ...


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