22

Inside the EU, they should have the same benefits, so if you don't plan on leaving the EU, it should not matter. However countires outside of the EU doesn't look at the EU as a single country, so they can have different (reciprocal) agreements. This includes getting tourist and also work visas outside of the EU. In this case you might get some benefit of ...


16

In the UK (similar to the US), there is no concept of national ID-based identification similar to eg. eastern-EU countries; neither are you required to have one at your person. There was an initiative to have one, called Identity Cards Act 2006, which was discontinued on 2010. Also from there Only workers in certain high-security professions, such as ...


16

In France, the law does not specify what counts as a valid ID, which is why official guidelines, like the one cited by @drat, remain deliberately vague (“Elle peut”) and mention things like “witness testimony”. In fact, article 78-2 of the code de procédure pénale provides that Les officiers de police judiciaire et, sur l'ordre et sous la responsabilité ...


15

No. (At least, I can say with certainty that Germany only counts residency in Germany. I strongly expect the other countries to be the same.) Granting citizenship is solely at the discretion of individual countries; there is no European dimension to it at all. This is a problem for people who move every three or four years, and would like to be able to ...


14

Wikipedia has an excellent article about these regions. The French DOM and Saint-Martin are part of the EU (albeit outside Schengen) and EU citizens can settle there without restriction. The Azores, Madeira and the Canary islands have a similar status. Together they are called “outermost regions” and EU law, including the free movement of persons, applies ...


13

As an EU citizen you are entitled to vote on both the European Parliamentary candidates and on the local/municipal elections. This is true for all EU countries, as it's part of the EU citizen voting rights (except if you are not in the country/EU when the election is happening, as in that case you might not be able to vote). You have to forfeit your ability ...


13

Embassies often have lists of doctors that speak the language of the country in question. I would call them and ask if they have a recommendation. That's how I found doctors in Asia. The UK Embassy in France lists for example a link to to AngloInfo, which in return has this page here about healthcare in France. The French US embassy has a list of English ...


12

From ihk24.de Staatsbürger aus allen EU-Mitgliedstaaten sowie aus Island, Norwegen und Liechtenstein genießen volle Niederlassungsfreiheit in Deutschland ohne Einschränkungen. Dies gilt im Unterschied zur Dienstleistungsfreiheit und zur Arbeitnehmerfreizügigkeit auch für das neue EU-Mitglied Kroatien Free translation: In contrast to the freedom ...


12

This website by the French government states the following on the subject: La personne contrôlée doit justifier de son identité. Elle peut présenter un titre d'identité (carte nationale d'identité, passeport ou permis de conduire), une autre pièce (document d'état civil avec filiation, livret militaire, carte d'électeur ou carte vitale), voire un ...


12

As an Italian citizen, you do not need a working visa for the Netherlands, as it is also in the European Union: All EU/EEA or Swiss citizens, with the exception of Croatians, are entitled to work without restriction in all sectors and industries. The same holds true for the UK, where you need neither a visa nor a work permit. This is linked to the ...


12

According to Appendix 7 of the German driving license regulations (Fahrerlaubnisverordnung), you can take the theoretical examination in German, English, French, Greek, Italian, Polish, Portuguese, Romanian, Russian, Croatian, Spanish, or Turkish.


12

Generally not. Residence requirements for naturalization generally refer to residence in the country itself. As an example, the naturalization requirements for France include in some cases a requirement for residence in France. Residence in another EU country does not serve to meet any requirement for naturalization in France.


11

To add on to StzupY's answer, a country's nationals often have a much easier time getting things done. That means, even if the law eventually treats everyone practically the same, foreign EU-nationals usually have to deal with more paperwork and longer processing times. I also think that there are still enough differences in civil law, that could have a ...


11

For the moment, nothing much would happen. EU law does allow member states to deny residency to EU citizens who don't have work or sufficient financial resources and ban them from receiving aid from the state, but unlike a few other EU countries, Germany has not used those provisions aggressively until now. As far as I know, you can still register without ...


10

As the others have said, the differences are mainly going to be perceptible outside the EU. But even within the union, some countries restrict some of their benefits to actual nationals: for instance, I'm a French citizen living in Sweden, and I can't benefit from their study grant program. I'd have to have the Swedish nationality. This is the only example ...


10

Yes, as a permanent resident you should be able to register your own company. There are various legal forms, and sometimes it's not clear what is the best choice for conducting a business. You should better consult with tax consultant what is the best option for your case. Also check the following site, which describes various things concerning freelancers ...


10

Your 'special categories' sound like the 'Highly Skilled Migrant' category. Now it's not clear what would qualify for that -- it sounds like it's something you can argue for any skill if you can provide evidence. However that doesn't exempt you from the work visa, it just makes the process simpler. From the Russian Embassy in the UK website: A foreign ...


10

NIE You obtain NIE by registering with Foreigners and Borders department of the National Police ("Comisaría General de Extranjería y Fronteras"). See the list of the offices. Note, that since quite a few years, there is separate, much easier and faster process for EU nationals ("comunitarios"), so don't make the mistake of wasting long hours in general ...


10

The most obvious choice for you is what's called an “Aufenthaltskarte für Familienangehörige eines Unionsbürgers” (Residence card for family members of an EU citizen). It's attractive because it's very cheap and easy to get (basically you need to prove that you are in fact married and still living together and that your wife has a job). You would then get ...


9

In the EU, the basic rules are actually pretty simple: Your country of residence is responsible for every license-related formalities (renewal when the license expires, replacement in case of theft, etc.) and must in any case recognize a license issued by another EU country. Additionally, you cannot (in principle) hold licenses from several EU countries or ...


9

This highly depends on your Bundesland since the police is under the jurisdiction of a federal state. Some of them explicitly welcome people without citizenship to apply, others do not permit them at all. You will however be required to deliver a Führungszeugnis, a certificate of good conduct, when applying which might be problematic depending on whether ...


9

One advantage could be the work permition - there were some restrictions for citizens of Bulgaria and Romania until 2014, and there are still restrictions for citizens of Croatia - only 8 EU countries don't restrict Croatian workers. So Croatian citizens (and most likely citizens of upcoming EU members) will benefit from dual EU citizenship Another point ...


9

As a foreign student, your university is required to provide you coverage. You must have that coverage through the whole term of your presence as a J1/F1/M1 student as part of the conditions of your visa. Talk to the university's international students' office for details. From what I know (second-hand experience), the prices are not all that different from ...


9

Yes you can. Having an EU passport, you're allowed to freely move, stay and live permanently in any other EU country (there were some exceptions with recent countries joined in EU but all these have been lifted now). But it's a good idea to check Austrian naturalization laws and ensure that they don't have any T&Cs for their citizenship. For example, ...


9

If we were to be married in New Zealand (a country that allows same sex marriage) can we then migrate to London where he would be able to live and work as my spouse? Yes. There are a number of issues here, and it's hard to know which you're asking about, so I will touch on a few of them. First, as you may know, the complicated history between Great ...


8

As far as I know there is no guideline that requires an employer to provide you bereavement leave either paid or unpaid. In the US Government provides 3 days leave for death of a relative as results of wounds but private employers are not required to abide by this but generally have some sort of policy for such situation, so I would get with the Human ...


8

Make sure your marriage is legal in the country you were married Get a copy of your marriage certificate Move to Ireland and have your spouse apply for a Residence Card Make sure your marriage is legal While Ireland will recognize a marriage conducted overseas, it needs to be a legally valid marriage in the country where it is conducted. From Ireland ...


8

I'm not an expert, but will try to answer you some questions here. As soon as you register your residence in Germany (which you are legally required to do) you becomes liable to German taxation. That means that you will need to do your tax declaration at the end of the year. Not sure if Germany and UK have double taxation avoidance treaty, you need to check ...


8

Since the license is from outside the EU, EU law does not specify exactly what the rules are so there might be differences from one country to the other within the EU. Being an EU citizen does not make much difference either. Worse, for US licenses, agreements are on a state-by-state basis, some licenses can be exchanged, other cannot. Fortunately, Ohio is ...


8

Do we apply for a Schengen or MVV visa in South Africa to allow my wife to enter the Netherlands? It's not really clear whether they will process your application as an MVV application, but there is certainly evidence that they will process it as a Schengen short-stay application. On the VFS Global site, the page about visiting family notes the fee ...


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