10

NHS has a page where you can check whether you are eligible for free treatments or not. Note, that GPs are free, but they don't have to accept new patients. Also going to an A&E, Walk-in centre or a Minor injuries unit is also free unless they need to admit you to a hospital. In the hospital some treatments are still free, for example infection ...


9

As a foreign student, your university is required to provide you coverage. You must have that coverage through the whole term of your presence as a J1/F1/M1 student as part of the conditions of your visa. Talk to the university's international students' office for details. From what I know (second-hand experience), the prices are not all that different from ...


4

There's a somewhat more straightforward explanation at http://www.nhs.uk/chq/pages/1087.aspx?categoryid=68&subcategoryid=162: If you move to the UK, you will not be charged for NHS hospital treatment from the date that you arrive as long as: you intend to live permanently in the UK, and you have the right to live permanently in the UK or ...


3

If you don't have a “médecin traitant”, there is a financial penalty. Physicians are allowed to charge more (dépassement d'honoraire), the statutory health insurance will only offer reduced coverage and the mutuelle should not cover the difference. The idea is that you should get a referral from your GP before going to other medical professionals (it's ...


3

The UK health system is very GP based (and even on top of that nurse based). Most private insurance is "top up" insurance and adds features to the standard NHS care. In London, and some other cities, you can get insurance that covers more or less anything. That said, you need to weigh the costs and benefits carefully. You may be better off paying out of ...


3

The ability to use another country's healthcare for free will depend on a few things. Firstly, whether or not they will just willingly treat. The UK is pretty good for this, for example in some situations. Secondly, it'll come down to reciprocity. Some countries have agreements that they'll treat the citizens of each other's country if visiting. For ...


3

The basic question is : can I get access to a doctor for a non-emergency treatment in France when I'm a visiting non-EU national. The answer is yes. (In particular if you don't intend to get some social security compensation as you explicitly mentioned). Depending on the technical aspect of the treatment you wish to require, that might be more or less easy ...


2

It is possible, but not covered by insurance. Source: official government site (in Dutch: "Wilt u een behandeling zelf betalen? Dan heeft u geen verwijzing nodig." - "Do you want to pay for the treatment yourself? Then you don't need a referral")


2

A majority of non-retired Americans, the vast majority if you exclude people poor enough to qualify for Medicaid, have employer-based health insurance. Employer group insurance premiums tend to be lower for what you get (self-selection effects in the individual market tend to make those risk pools sicker), and are cheaper still because the premiums are paid ...


1

Links are to the Castilian versions: if your Catalan is better, there's a language switcher in the top-right. Who is insured by CatSalut?: The body which recognises and accredits the condition of insured person is the National Institute of Social Security (INSS). So if you're registered for social security, you're probably eligible. Take your SS ...


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