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It would clearly be cleaner if you fully moved everything to Canada (and I wouldn't be too confident that the Canadian dollar is as low as it can go) but I think you'll be okay if you do it your way. I actually think your greyest legal areas will be in Canada, rather than the US. You don't necessarily lose your state of residence when you move out of the US ...


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No. Otherwise I think you'll find a lot of doctors/lawyers with huge loans would head overseas immediately to wipe off six figure loans... Indeed, government websites point out that you need to notify them if overseas for more than three months, as your repayment rates may change, and if you don't you may actually incur penalties, rather than having your ...


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I have lived in Thailand (your neighbour to the north!) for over 13 years, and it was several years before I was able to apply for a loan to buy a car here. Even then, I needed a Thai citizen to sign as guarantor to the loan. Obviously my experience is useful for Thailand, and maybe not so much for Malaysia. However - in general terms, before applying for ...


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No such websites exist in English. Use the Google Translate functionality built into Google Chrome to use German comparison sites.


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The applicable website ExpatFocus notes that you'll need some evidence of good credit, documents etc, but otherwise should be possible for expats: With a valid visa and a decent credit rating, most expats are able to get loans from a Malaysian bank. The requirements are similar to those of a loan from an American institution. For an expat to apply for ...


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OeAD, the Austrian Agency for International Cooperation in Education and Research, describes Proof of sufficient funds to finance your stay in Austria, e.g. savings or bank deposit, proof of purchase of traveller’s cheques, letter of guarantee of a person living in Austria or an institution domiciled in Austria. If you need a loan, it would need to be ...


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This is going to depend on so many more factors than your visa and house value. Each bank has their own underwriters and policies on this. The only way you're going to definitively be able to answer this is to discuss with a mortgage broker in BC, or with one of the loan managers at one of the banks.


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