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From https://citizenpath.com/travel-abroad-affects-citizenship-eligibility/ (mirror) (general answer, not conditioned on satisfying A, C, and D): Disrupting the Continuous Residence Requirement: In general, the following guidelines apply for permanent residents who are traveling abroad: A trip abroad that is less than 6 months will not disrupt continuous ...


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USCIS now has a very nice set of web pages that discuss the entire flow of the immigrant visa process. You're interested in this page in particular. I've extracted the relevant paragraph below: When should I travel? You must arrive in and apply for admission to the United States no later than the visa expiration date printed on your visa. An immigrant visa ...


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I scored 109/120 on a TOEFL internet based test 12 years ago Now, the 12 years ago won't matter, my ten year old IELTS test was accepted just fine but https://www.cic.gc.ca/english/helpcentre/answer.asp?qnum=572 doesn't list the TOEFL and states We don’t accept any other third-party test results, even if they’re similar. Continuing on, I have a Masters ...


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As DJClayworth's answer -- which I have upvoted and accepted as the right answer -- says, the United States cannot officially keep people from going to Canada, but "national security" can be a fairly large exception to the rule. For an example of how this loophole can be exploited, I googled around and found this story of peace activists being ...


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No this is absolutely not true. I know many Americans who have moved to Canada long term, and become Canadian citizens. Not one of them had to ask permission of the US government. Among other pieces of evidence, consider the huge number of people who moved to Canada to avoid the US draft in the 60s and 70s. If permission had been required they would not have ...


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On https://www.service-public.fr/particuliers/vosdroits/F2213, you can read : Lieu de résidence Vous devez résider en France au moment de la signature du décret de naturalisation. La notion de résidence est plus large que la notion habituelle de domicile. Elle implique que vous devez avoir en France le centre de vos intérêts matériels (notamment ...


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Avoiding any trip over 180 days outside the country does let you avoid an automatic presumption of being ineligible for naturalization, but it does not guarantee that you will be considered eligible. The overriding concern, in both cases, is whether you maintained a continuous residence, and "continuous residence" is not defined by the length of ...


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Chapter 4 - Physical Presence - A: USCIS will count the day that an applicant departs from the United States and the day he or she returns as days of physical presence within the United States for naturalization purposes. As to whether dates should be added that result in 0 days (but 25 hours) as a result: a complete list is probably preferred to list ...


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No one can give you 100% sure answer. Revokation of Irish citizenship is an extremely rare proceduce. It was done five times to this date. All cases were based on Section 19 (1)(a) "certificate was procured by fraud" of Irish Nationality and Citizenship Act 1956. https://www.independent.ie/irish-news/shane-phelan-there-have-only-ever-been-five-...


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According to USCIS Policy Manual, Volume 12, Part D, Chapter 4, the physical presence requirement of at least 30 months means at least 913 days.


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If one got permanent residency by applying for Adjustment of Status (I-485) from within the US, they usually became a permanent resident when the I-485 was approved. If one got permanent residency by doing Consular Processing at a US consulate abroad for an immigrant visa, they became a permanent resident the moment they entered the US with that immigrant ...


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