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3

It doesn't. Nowhere in the oath does it talk about renouncing "citizenship" or "nationality" at all. It talks about renouncing "allegiance and fidelity". Allegiance and fidelity are different from citizenship. Whether you have a country's citizenship or nationality is decided solely by that country's law, and for many countries, renouncing citizenship ...


0

My understanding has always been that the US does not recognize dual citizenship. If you are a US Citizen, then the US Government will treat you as a US Citizen, with all the rights, protections, and privileges that is afforded by that status. For example: If another country requested to have you extradited, you would still be viewed SOLELY as a US Citizen....


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The text of the oath was fixed before US law changed with respect to multiple citizenship, and it has not been changed since.


3

You should urgently apply for settled status. ILR means nothing anymore (except it means that you will get settled status without problems). If you don't have settled status by the end of 2020, you are in trouble. Even if you could have got settled status without problems if you only had applied. Apart from that, you must have evidence that you passed the "...


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I'm a Canadian who 2 years ago discovered how Jus Sanguinis works. I am eligible to "recover" or "prove" citizenship in any of the following ways: Germany, by Great grandparents Romania, by grandparents Spain, by relatives more distant. I was very suprised at this. Lithuania, by Great Grandparents. Last year I decided to visit all of these places, ...


3

As far as the documentary requirements for returning to the US, the green card by itself allows you to return to the US after an absence of less than one year. You can always be asked to prove that you maintained residence in the US, no matter how long or short your absence was. (It's possible to be found to have abandoned residence even if each of your ...


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