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7

You will require the following Your travel document (passport) Your HKID Card A paper bill addressed to your name, with your home mailing address OR a lease agreement in your name. This is an example of what they expect: Standard Chartered - documents required. You could probably get away without a bill with your home address (since you're staying in a ...


4

Use an HR company to do the visa process in the stead of your employer. Your employer signs a contract with a local HR company, which recruits you and sponsors your visa. Your employer pays your salary and a fee to the HR company, and the HR company pays you your salary, and usually provides group medical insurance. Source: been there done that. Edit Note:...


3

I did this, though I was within the engineering field. It took me around 12 months to find a company that was willing to provide sponsorship. I found out that some commonwealth countries such as the UK, Australia and Canada have a holiday working Visa for under 30. Hong Kong reciprocates this. 3 months is also a typical probation period of a company.... ...


3

It does, why wouldn't it? You still need to file quarterly estimates based on your expected tax liability. However, in many cases FEIE and Foreign Tax Credit will lead to zero tax liability, and then the question becomes moot, but if it is not so for you (keep in mind the SE taxes...) then you still need to file quarterly estimates. You're required to file ...


2

You will need a bill, showing a HK address, or a letter from a property owner saying you live there (or lease agreements or something). You will need to prove that you've been in HK for a continuous 7 years, not leaving for more than 2 years at a time. You will probably require a bank account statement, or proof of income tax payment. For travel documents, ...


2

The best way forward would be to make a formal representation to the deciding post, where your parents had applied for your British registration certificate. If the decision was to grant you British nationality was approved, then it should not be an issue, as you would be able to receive your certificate from them.


2

Many (some? most?) countries do not have a concept of “registration” like Germany (and a few other countries like the Netherlands, Austria, Switzerland, Poland, Hungary, etc.) has. That's an idea you need to lose to think clearly about the issue. In countries that don't have that, you would be deemed a resident based on the length or the intent of your stay. ...


2

I just translated myself and that was enough. You might want to clarify with your HR or immigration representative who's handling your application. But from my knowledge and experience it was always sufficient enough to just have any kind of translation. All my friends and colleagues did the same.


2

You having a Hong Kong Permanent Identity Card means that you are (or were) a Hong Kong permanent resident. Neither having this card nor being a Hong Kong permanent resident means that you are a Chinese citizen. Hong Kong permanent residents can be Chinese citizens or foreign citizens. If you had an HKSAR passport, that would tell us that (at least Hong Kong ...


1

For someone requiring visa sponsorship, what is the likelihood is of finding a role in a professional occupation in HK within 3 months? Three months is too short, I think; without an employer, it takes more like 8-12 months. But with that said, you can't know exactly; if you are lucky and you found an employer who needs your specialty, it can be done in 1 ...


1

According to the Immigration Department Guidebook for Professionals for Employment in Hong Kong (at the foot of page 13): Important Notice Where a document is not in Chinese or English, it must be accompanied by a Chinese or English translation certified as a true translation by a sworn translator, court translator, authorised public translator, ...


1

Hong Kong is on the DVLA's list of designated countries with which you can exchange your driving licence on a like for like basis. Gov.uk has a very informative section about exchanging foreign driving licences. As you have a provisional licence, I'm not if or how the rules differ from a full licence, so you may have to do some research yourself. You would ...


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