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9

Gaël Laurans already did a good job explainig the generics, I'll add some UK specific information. First of all, the government has a page on how to claim the State Pension when you are living abroad. Depending on when you were born you might need to have enough UK NI contribution years to be able to claim at least some pension. I couldn't find a full table ...


8

You seem to be out of luck! If you have worked in Norway, you are only able to get your pension once you reach retirement age (67) if you have worked in Norway for more than 3 years. This webpage from the University of Oslo for its international employees explains this: 3 years of employment is required to get a pension from the Norwegian Public Service ...


5

Yes there are such plans available but they may not be available yet on individual basis. Namely the may be available for large multinational corporations rather then individual employees or self-employed. You can take a look at the article by Mark Price from Mercer Group on the subject of IPPs(International Pension Plans) which provide you exactly what ...


5

It depends completely on the specifics of your situation, there is no general rule. I am not sure how EU law applies to this situation and it would in any case not cover the years you worked outside of the EU so you might have to deal with each country individually and the relevant bilateral agreements. You also have to make a distinction between different ...


4

The (kinda) new German Personalausweis has two - separate - uses vaguely related to "electronic signatures": The "Online-Ausweisfunktion" (on-line identification), also called eID (for "electronic Identity" [sic!]) When applying for one, you will indeed be asked, if you want to use this feature. If you answer "yes" (and are old enough), you should get a "...


4

If you only have state pension you don't really need to do anything if you stay in the EU when you retire. Once you reach the retirement age in the country you have last worked (which might be different to the one where you are resident, in case you never worked there), then they will calculate your pension based on two different ways: Option 1: National ...


3

Generally speaking, your mother is not entitled to any benefits under current EU rules. Pensioners are free to live wherever they like in the EU but as “non-economically active persons”, which means in particular that they should have: comprehensive health insurance cover there sufficient income (from any source) to live without needing income ...


3

The minimum duration for collecting a pension is five years. It is possible to pay voluntary contributions. However, during the period for which you want to pay, you need to be living in Germany, or be a German citizen, or be living in some other member state of the EEA or in Switzerland after having contributed at least once before, or be a citizen of a ...


3

This firstly depends on how long you have lived in Norway and if you are thinking about private or public pension. Within the EU, most countries fortunately have an agreement over transferring the earned pensions. Both Norway and Great Britain are members of this agreement, i.e. your public pension is transfered. However, a good share of your pension in ...


3

The money still belongs to you, regardless of your work status. If your work permit expires, you can continue to contribute or withdraw your funds but since you cannot work, your employer cannot direct-deposit anything to your RRSP account. Your choices are: if you expect to get a new work permit, you can keep your funds in Canada, or if you're expecting to ...


3

In the case when you need to do nothing to get your pension currently and it automatically goes into your bank account all the time: Although one approach is to seek whether you can have these funds sent to your bank in your current country of residence instead, another approach is to simply keep the bank accounts and cards associated with it and either ...


3

As was noted, the retirement annuity pension is the only portion of the social security benefits that you may be able to claim. In order to determine whether you are entitled to cash out those contributions, you would need to contact the pension authorities: Instituto Nacional de Seguridad Social Ministerio de Empleo y Seguridad Social C/ Padre Damián, 4-6 ...


2

No. Only temporary residents can access their super when leaving Australia permanently. That includes transferring the benefit out of an Australian super fund. Australian citizens and Australian permanent residents cannot access their superannuation because they can always chose to retire in Australia. A recent rule that allows an exception is the Trans-...


2

MLC will have been writing to you to tell you your options. You can have access to Australian Super from age 55. If deemed a 'trivial amount' (I do not know threshold for this) it can be paid as lump sum, but you will have to see how HMRC treat the receipt of this - probably as income taxed at highest marginal rate. If over threshold, can be paid as ...


2

You should indeed be entitles to the dutch AOW pension. The sum will be 13/50 = 26% of the full pension. Depending on your marital state, this adds up to a pre-tax amount between 200 (married) and 300 (single) in Euro per month. There is a possibility that your spouse was also under the dutch social security system during those 13 years, in which case 2 ...


2

Actually the secretary sent me the Badem-Württemburg Erklärung zur Sozialversicherung form (42101s) which has a section that explains the issue. Basically, it says that paying this contribution will allow the working duration to be taken into consideration in various "Mindesversicherungzeiten" (minimum insured time) regulations when it comes to collecting ...


2

When you say 'each conversation ends when Canada is mentioned' I hope it isn't too abrupt an ending. I'm assuming that you're told that their practice doesn't deal too much about Canadian tax. It would be nice if they could provide a reference to some one in their profession who does. These other telephone calls, where there are questions, are ...


2

It should be possible. You have to wait 24 months and waive your right to a German pension, then you can get back the money you paid into Social Security (but not the part that was contributed by your employer, so essentially half of what was paid) - source: https://www.deutsche-rentenversicherung.de/Allgemein/de/Inhalt/Allgemeines/FAQ/International/...


1

No, you can't. The health insurance covered any medical costs during the time you were insured. The pension contributions for the 5 years that you have worked will be stored and rated in the form of points, for each year, from 0 to 100 50 being for an average wage for that year of all employees in Germany 100 for the highest amount possible (2019: € 54....


1

When you apply for a pension in another country, these times may also be taken into consideration - depending on existing treatys. Before you leave Germany you should apply for a 'Kontoklärung'. You may notice that there are gaps with 'Fehlzeiten' starting with 17 (use to be 16). If you went to any schools between 17 and 25, these times can be added to ...


1

There are a few options available for you. You could endorse the cheque to a friend in Australia, mail it to them (postage cost), they could then bank it, and transfer you the money over PayPal. The downside is PayPal takes a percentage, which could hurt. (I'm writing this for other readers, as I realise your not-negotiable line removes it) If however this ...


1

PFIC has nothing to do with FATCA, and was there way way before FATCA. PFIC is a real thing, and avoiding investing in funds/holding companies to avoid PFIC qualification is a very good advice. Specifically with pensions you may also be dealing with foreign trusts, which is another can of worms. Your friend should hire a US-licensed tax adviser who's ...


1

The Agreement between Japan and France on Social Security According to above article, if you paid pension in both countries they will be added together.


1

Pension == Public Employee? He should ask the body of government that pays his pension. In his - new - country of residence he will have to pay the normal income tax on income from his pension.


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