10

You don't have to inform any agency. It could however be beneficial to report any movements outside of the Netherlands to: The ministry of foreign affairs for election (you already stated you did so) The consulate/embassy in your country of resident. Note that this is not automatically done if you register for elections. This is specifically interesting to ...


8

No, you are not a resident of The Hague if you live abroad. Note that you are only able to vote in national and EU¹ elections. You are not able to vote in next weeks municipal elections. All adult residents of The Hague are able to vote in The Hague's municipal elections. As you are not able to vote in the municipal elections, this logically means you ...


7

It seems possible in principle but there are several restrictions. Particularly relevant is the fact that any period of residence in the Netherlands in the past 25 years would be subtracted from the period during which you can benefit from the 30%-rule. The relevant status is article 10ef of the Uitvoeringsbesluit loonbelasting 1965 (I got the reference from ...


7

I just wanted to follow up on this to provide some clarity for those who come across this question in their search through the complexities of the Dutch Nationality Law. Definitely the reason this question couldn't be fully answered originally was because of my misunderstanding of the Dutch Law which I am now a bit more across (at least for my partner's ...


6

Generally you just say you are married when anyone asks you, in most cases they will just simply believe you. If they need proof you just have to show them your foreign marriage certificate. If it doesn't have an English translation you should translate it using an official translator though, otherwise they won't know what it means. Some foreign registrars (...


5

I was not able to find information on the official site, but some people here mention that when they exchanged their licences for a UK one, the dates on the back of the licence reflected when they were first able to drive a car, while the date on the front was the date of UK issue. So your licence should show that you have held a valid licence for 10 years. ...


3

Is this at all possible? Probably not. For your son to be a Dutch national, there must be an unbroken chain of Dutch nationality from your father, through you, to your son. There are provisions for former Dutch nationals to regain their Dutch nationality, but it seems likely that you are not a former Dutch national, and even more likely that your son is ...


3

Labour market testing is the process sponsors have to go through to check there is no Australian suitable for a particular job before employing someone overseas. Labour market testing is required for applicants from all countries, unless that requirement is in breach of Australia's international trade obligations. From the Department's website, the ...


3

The embassy probably doesn't know whether your father had Dutch nationality when you were born, since the circumstances governing this could include any of several things that they wouldn't have known about. The best way, and the way the Dutch government would go about it, would be to investigate the relevant points in his life. Before doing that, though, ...


3

We finally got a response back from the Dutch embassy in London after over 2 weeks. The answer is this (I used Google translate as the response is in Dutch): Thanks for your email of July 25, 2017. It is indeed confusing because there are two different exams are: the civic integration examination abroad and the integration examination for ...


2

Your husband can live with you very easily in any EU country other than the Netherlands by virtue of the directive 2004/38/EC. Thus, you can easily live together in Germany. To live together in the Netherlands immediately after your marriage, you would have to apply under Dutch national law. On the linked pages, you can see that this includes an income ...


2

Formally, there are two ways to qualify for residency in another EU country: as an economically active person and as an economically non-active person. The difference is that an “economically non-active person” must prove that she has sufficient resources and health insurance not to become a burden for the social safety net in her country of residence. You ...


2

The registration process you quoted from gov.uk is only relevant to British citizens. All countries generally recognize marriages established other countries. (Excepting new stuff like gay marriages).


2

By my reading of the requirements, your three-year marriage excuses you from the requirement to have lived in the Netherlands for five years, but it does not excuse you from the requirement to hold a valid Dutch residence permit at the time of your application for naturalization. In other words, you cannot take the integration test outside the Netherlands ...


2

According to wikipedia your mother was Dutch when you were born because she was not an adult when she became a naturalized Australian (and so, I don't believe she lost her Dutch citizen). However, according to phoog (our local Dutch nationality expert) here your mother lost her Dutch nationality when her parents naturalized, because she was included on ...


2

Your daughter probably lost her Dutch nationality on 1 April 2013, 10 years after the dual nationality rule change in 2003. The rule that went into effect then is that a Dutch citizen who has other nationality and lives outside the kingdom or the EU for 10 years loses Dutch nationality. If that is true, it would explain the failure of her earlier passport ...


1

Would I be allowed to join him there? Maybe. At article 3(2)(b), the directive includes among its beneficiaries "the partner with whom the Union citizen has a durable relationship, duly attested." The interpretation and application of this provision are left to each country, however, and I don't know what criteria Sweden applies to the ...


1

It would *appear so. DutchCitizenship.com has a 4 point test, that you qualify IF: Since 2010 Latent Dutch Citizens can obtain Dutch nationality by following the Option Procedure. Conditions: Born before January 1, 1985 Born to a Dutch mother Your mother was a Dutch citizen at the time of your birth. Born to a non-Dutch father No ...


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