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27

For a general idea, I recommend this formula: CurrentSalary EUR * (EUR/USD Rate) * CostOfLivingIndexValue of SF or NY. If you make 50k EUR, that's about 70k USD as of March 2014 (with EUR = 1.39 USD). SF and NY are about 1.6 times more expensive than the average urban city in the US, so you would need $112k. This doesn't really take into account ...


16

Of course, the salaries you're talking about here are gross (as in pre-tax), so obviously first step would be to calculate net salary. In US you have to components of the income tax, first the federal tax, then in some cases state tax (California is one of these states, and actually has the highest state tax of all). BTW. what's generally called net income ...


12

I do not exactly understand what you want to know, if you want to estimate the salary you need or you can expect in the US (which are 2 different things). But I can still give you clues about the differences of budget between these two situations. I spent some time in SF and live in France. The things I noticed when it comes to comparing salaries and ...


10

To answer you question, being a former H1B myself. You are in valid h1b status because you are working. Your employer however has violated the H1B statutes and Labor statutes by not paying you. At some point after not getting paid, and particularly finding out your company is out of funds, USCIS can reasonably infer that you were no longer employed/out of ...


8

As the same gross salary can and will result in very different net payments to the employee, it does not make much sense to discuss salaries in 'net'. In any job description or offer, and in most discussions, salaries mentioned are therefore gross values. It depends of course of the circumstances - a job that somebody currently has results in a well defined ...


8

The proposed salary is almost spot on what is referred to as 'modaal inkomen', or the median income: the most common income in the country. Therefore, you should be able to live on this salary just fine! But it really all depends on your lifestyle, of course. Keep in mind there are other things that will be taken out of your salary too, like in most ...


8

Here is how much a hypothetical above average (1.5x) software developer could save/invest after expenses and taxes in New York and Berlin. I think it is important to also include what your level of spending is, since this can greatly influence the amount you can invest for later. Be aware that this kind of calculation naturally comes with a lot of caveats ...


6

Here is one simulator you can use for that. You can find others by looking for things like “nettoloon” or ”bruto netto” together with “Nederland” (name of the country in Dutch, to get rid of results about Belgium). You haven't said anything about the type of work or the level of salary but my guess would be that you can expect the take-home pay to be ...


5

In most places in the world it is usual to quote salaries as gross (i.e. before any taxes or social security payments), simply because everyone's tax situation could potentially be very different. You can estimate the amount of tax you would be required to pay by looking at the tax rates, and also see if there are any other deductions that will be taken. ...


5

US salary figures are typically gross, and do not include bonuses, though a bonus may be mentioned in addition. Bonuses vary widely by industry and by the type of employer. Many jobs will have no bonus; others will have a small end-of-year bonus of similar value to a small gift ($50, say). Still others will have bonuses that will run into the thousands or ...


4

There is a huge difference missed by all the answers here - in the US your employment is generally high risk; i.e. you can be fired at any time and will receive no more than two week's of pay or notice. Whereas in France, employees often have 60 or 90 days of notice period. So the lower French salary can in fact be much more stable. In Europe your largest ...


4

This is a very partial answer, because while I live in the Netherlands, all of my labor law experience is knowledge is from a different state and legal culture (Israel). Still, it might be useful to you. You must at least reply. Regardless of whether you reach the conclusion that you owe them the money, or reach the conclusion that you don't owe it (or owe ...


4

You would be able to get by, but not save anything, I would think. I live alone, my salary is ~3,850 before taxes, I enjoy the 30% ruling, and manage to save about 1,000 EUR per month or so. I rent a 1.5-bedroom apartment for 1,275 EUR a month, ride a bike to work, and I'm pretty frugal in my expenses (I think), except for a visit to my home country every ...


4

Generally speaking, a promotion and a salary increase are extensions to your contract that must be accepted by both parties in writing. This is no big deal normally, both sign the extra page, the employee walks out of the office happy. As you did not agree, there was no promotion and no salary increase. Legally, it's not rolled back, because legally, you ...


3

Take the one with shorter travel distance. This exact issue has been disused on vlogbrothers by Hank quite recently Sources (taken from vlogbrothers): Homeownership doesn't increase happiness: http://www.nytimes.com/2013/07/14/rea... Short Commute = $40,000 raise http://www.npr.org/2011/10/19/1415144... Commuting Linked to Lower Life ...


3

I've worked in a few EU countries, and in all of them common practice is to display your gross salary, either monthly, or yearly. When paying they will deduct the taxes you have to pay, and only pay you the rest. (This usually only applies for workers, and not contractors or self-employed people) If you are unsure about the local taxes salary calculator ...


3

Information on the median income in the UK is available for 2013-2014. The data are for personal income and not household income. For the inner boroughs of London, an income of £30,000 would put you above the median income in Greenwich, Hackney, Islington, Lambeth, Lewisham, Southwark, Tower Hamlets and below in Camden, Hammersmith, Kensington and Chelsea, ...


3

Here are some tools you can use to compare the numbers with your expectations and goals: You can check the cost of living here, and calculate the expected tax deductions here. In case those links go down, the searches I did for those were "west lafayette cost of living" and "indiana tax deductions", respectively. There are likely other comparable ...


3

Firstly, Amsterdam is a fantastic city and the Netherlands is a great place to live. :-) EUR 52k per year gross is around EUR 2900 per month net. That's a decent salary in the Netherlands and somewhat above the average, but accommodation in Amsterdam is expensive. To give you some idea of costs - if you're renting a place on your own, you won't find much ...


3

Your best bet is to create a Transferwise bank account. That gives you an American routing number which your customer can wire the money to (which should be straightforward for them). You can then transfer the money to your local bank. For personal transfers, Transferwise charge $34.28 to transfer $5,000. If you can't get through the Transferwise money ...


2

As a European who's currently living in North America, I feel that there's a lot of confusion over salary comparisons between different markets. Lets break it down step by step: Currency First of all, think in one currency, even if the two currencies are close in value. 1 Euro is currently 1.15 US dollars. Or conversely 1 US dollar is 0.87 Euros. Convert ...


2

I lived in SF for 20 years. I live in Paris currently, now for 2 years 2016-2018. Agreed, the salaries are half in Paris. It’s pitiful!!! I made more in Fast Food at minimum wage with no degree. Paris they require a Masters to work handing out bread! My starting salary 20 years ago as an admin assistant was 40K. When I left, 4 years ago, I was making 65K ...


2

Tax rates are progressive, the higher your income over the whole year, the higher the tax percentage. The amounts that were deducted from your monthly income are always based on the assumption that you would receive that income for the entire year. If you only worked for 8 months, your total yearly income will be lower than assumed, and less of it will be ...


2

I don't know how much are living costs in US, but I suppose, by the same salary, it's better to stay there. Switzerland is very expensive. The taxes (by such income) will consume about 1/3 of your salary. A single appartment may cost as much as 2000 CHF/month. Food is very expensive, a regular meal outside will cost from 20CHF, fast food like McDonald or ...


2

I have had the experience of getting the 30% ruling a while after I started working - so retroactive requests are not a problem (though they might be if you cross the boundary of a tax year; not sure about that point). However, [edit] a Master's degree and being under 30 merely reduce the salary minimum to apply the 30% ruling. As explained, for example, ...


2

1) Is annual base salary the final amount? The annual base salary is pretty much what Dennis explained in his comment. The salary you will get will have CPP, EI (differs from province to province) deducted from it and so it will be considerably less than if you divide your annual salary by 12 months. Keep in mind that there are high tax rates in Canada and ...


2

Here's a start: Comparison of living costs Stockholm vs Seattle I can't comment on taxes etc (I believe they are likely to be higher in Stockholm), but for pure costs it appears Seattle is about 14% more expensive.


2

Assuming you are paying tax via pay as you earn (PAYE) indeed, the monthly net income should be the annual net income divided by 12. You seem to have been confused by the personal allowance. Yes, the "first £12,500" you earn in a year is "tax free", but in order to avoid pay cheques varying month-to-month, HMRC estimates how much your annual income will be ...


2

This really depends. Taxes are lower in Germany but Munich has become very expensive to live in, even compared to Oslo. However, Norway includes its health insurance and better pension benefits in its taxes which come on top in Germany. Oslo is much smaller than Munich, therefore commutes are typically shorter but this depends on where you would live and ...


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