Episode #125 of the Stack Overflow podcast is here. We talk Tilde Club and mechanical keyboards. Listen now
10

The only fee for overstaying in Thailand is the per-day overstay fee, which is capped at 20,000 THB. Add that to the cost of flying to the UK (around 50,000 THB tops) he should need no more than 70,000 THB, which is less than 1,400 GBP. Once he has a ticket to leave the country, then he just needs to go to Suvarnabhumi airport and pay the overstay fee when ...


10

Your nephew is not automatically barred from applying for a student visa for the UK. However, the visa application will ask: Have you ever been deported, removed or otherwise required to leave any country, including the UK? [source] It will be up to UK immigration authorities as to how, if at all, the US overstay will affect the visa decision.


5

Adjustment of status in your circumstances would only be possible if you had an immediate relative US citizen to sponsor you. Assuming that neither of your parents is a US citizen, and that you are not currently married to a US citizen, the only ways for you to achieve this would be for you to marry your girlfriend and for her to immigrate to the US, ...


5

Since you left the US after accruing more than 1 year of "unlawful presence", you triggered a 10-year ban, which will end in January 2026. (Not sure why you left the US. If you stayed in the US after marriage, you would have been eligible to apply for Adjustment of Status in the US to become a permanent resident with no problems.) Your husband can still ...


5

If she left at her own expense over 2 years ago, overstaying should not be a problem for either a visit or a spouse visa. A "spouse visa" (if you want to live in the UK) requires the British partner to have earnings equivalent to at least £18,600 per year. You might be able to count your overseas earnings, but it can be complicated: https://www.gov.uk/join-...


5

It might. According to the Treaty between US and UK on Immigration Information Sharing: “Information” means data on Nationals of a Third Country seeking authorization to transit through, travel to, work in, live in, or take citizenship of, the United Kingdom (UK) or the United States (U.S.), and other immigration and nationality-related data about ...


4

Never overstay your permission to stay anywhere in any circumstances. When you apply for a visa, your history is looked into in detail, and they are looking for reasons to reject the application. If they find that you have ever previously overstayed your permission to stay anywhere in the world, you just gave them a reason to reject your application.


4

Not without an additional visa. I guess however, since it is just to bridge the gap between two residence permits, that it should be no problem for you to get a short-term (type C) visa for the period from August 1st to 14th.


3

You should contact your embassy or consulate in the host country. One of the jobs of the consular staff is to help their citizens when they are in trouble. The embassy might extend a loan to buy a ticket home. (At least European nations do that, you didn't mention where you come from.) If and how they will help depends on the circumstances, and your ...


3

Assuming the child has now been born in Norway, you no longer have a problem. For the benefit of others, I will answer as if it is still December 2015 and your visa has not yet expired. If you have missed the chance to renew your visa, and you cannot renew it by briefly leaving the country (which in this case of course you couldn't), then it is generally ...


3

All of the countries you've listed require that you disclose your immigration history, including removals, refusals, and bans. Not doing so is a bad idea, and can result in visa denials, refusals, bans. New Zealand is the same: you have to reveal your UK history and removal or risk not being issued a visa. You noted on SETravel that you do not have a ...


3

According to OP: Well! I got the spouse visa, but the Danes sure took their time. It was granted 6 months after the application! The delay was the most unpleasant thing ever! But it was all good in the end! Sorry for the 'very' late reply though!


3

As the UKVI published its Good character: nationality policy guidance on 27 July 2017, it seems a good time to take up the gauntlet thrown down by @GayotFow (albeit long overdue). Annex D to chapter 18, in its very preface, makes clear: There is no definition of ‘good character’ in the British Nationality Act 1981 (‘the BNA 1981’) and therefore no ...


2

He might answer that question with "don't know" and then add an explanation what actually happened. He was obviously not deported or removed. Whether he was "required to leave the country", when a removal order was issued but he left voluntarily before ever learning of that removal order is debatable - give UK immigration a chance to decide that maybe you ...


2

Overstay is not an issue as long as you can provide a valid reason for the same, What I would suggest is to explain the reason for overstay in your letter of intent/ statement of purpose when submitting the visa application to explain your situation to the visa officer.


2

It is nearly impossible to give an easy and short answer to this. A blue card is valid 3 Month after the job has ended, but in the first 2 years you need yo ask for permission if you want to change your job with a blue card http://www.bluecard-eu.de/eu-blue-card-germany/residence-act/bc.html A quick research shows me that there are several types of visa ...


1

Sadly, while it does not seem like a big deal to overstay a visa, most countries see it as a very serious crime, and people who do it are treated very harshly. According to this site, it sounds like you have to get together enough money to pay the overstay fees before you present yourself at an airport. You must also have money to cover the visa extension ...


1

While you may be eligible and apply to enter the UK under the Ancestry program, it is still a visa application process and you will need to provide quite a few documents, in addition to your current passport. These include birth certificates, yours and your parent(s) and grandparent(s) upon which your ancestry claim is based. In addition, you will be ...


1

It might affect, it might not, but you will not gain anything by waiting. You need to apply, disclose everything they ask (but do not volunteer anything). If you have resources, consider hiring a good immigration lawyer. https://www.shusterman.com/ is top US immigration lawyer firm, and has huge amount of info on their website. Also, you need to hurry. ...


1

It's not obvious that she is actually staying illegally in Berlin at the moment. This requirement to exit and reenter to trigger the 90-day visa-free short stay is nowhere to be found in the Schengen regulations. It's true that the Netherlands officially considers this to be necessary but other countries do not. Furthermore, invalidating a student residence ...


1

It shouldn't have any effect on getting an immigrant visa to the US.


1

If you come from a country that can enter the Schengen area visa-free, you could stay in Norway for up to 90 days past your expiration date. If not, read on. No, unless you're prevented from leaving the country due to serious circumstances, such as illness According to Sleeping In Airports, Trondheim Airport closes overnight. So, no, they won't let you in ...


1

2k pounds is not too bad. Remember, the person has to eat and stay somewhere as well and prepare themselves to leave. I don't know other parts of the circumstances, such as if there are unpaid medical bills or a dependent involved. What will he do once he is back in his home country? Needs some cash for that also. Of course today 2k pounds is worth ...


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