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Yes you can. Having an EU passport, you're allowed to freely move, stay and live permanently in any other EU country (there were some exceptions with recent countries joined in EU but all these have been lifted now). But it's a good idea to check Austrian naturalization laws and ensure that they don't have any T&Cs for their citizenship. For example, ...


4

Yes, you can. See e.g. europa.eu. You will obviously need to follow all the local regulations. You can continue to reside in the UK as long as you fulfill the conditions (I don't know exactly what they are for self-employed people, I suppose some genuine activity is required, merely registering yourself as self-employed might not be enough) or qualify in ...


3

Promoting comments to an answer, but with a big caveat - you need to talk to a proper advisor about this! If you are only working for one single company long term, you are unlikely to be able to do that as self-employed in the UK. The term to google for is IR35. Basically though, with one long-term company / client, you'll be deemed to be effectively an ...


2

The reason you can't find any information is that there's no such visa. Long-term visas are, generally speaking, for family (spouse/fiance visas, etc), students, or work visas (inc. charity work). Most classes of long-term visa require a sponsor (university, charity, employer, etc). You can't get a work visa as a self-employed person, unless you have a ...


2

There would be no problem with being self employed once you have the right to work in the UK. Most likely you would get a family visa, unless you have the means to obtain an investor visa. You tagged the question with brexit but that won't affect you directly unless you're an EU national (edit: or you are living in another EU country with your spouse now)(I ...


1

I'm not a lawyer so take my answers with pinch of salt. Answers: You can be "self-employed" and use an umbrella company to have legal rights to stay in NL. The umbrella company even will apply for your 30% ruling. So you don't need to keep two jobs. Having one client is usually the problem when your income is lower than a certain amount. I assume ...


1

In general, F-1 students must enroll full time. This page from Homeland Security explains the exceptions, particularly that you can remain in F-1 status without enrolling full time in case of properly documented illness or medical condition, for up to 12 months. This is based on federal regulation 8 CFR 214.2(f)(6)(iii)(B). Unfortunately there isn't a ...


1

Your simplest option may be to enroll on a Masters program and enter the UK as a student. However, your options for remaining after the course ends are limited. You can apply for a job in the UK from where you are now but the employer would have to show they cannot readily fill the vacancy with an EEA applicant in order to sponsor your visa.


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